New Hart's Rules: The Oxford Style Guide, Edition 2

OUP Oxford
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For over a hundred years, Hart's Rules has been the authority on style, helping writers and editors prepare copy for publication. The latest edition of this guide has been updated for the twenty-first century using the resources of Oxford Dictionaries and with the advice of publishing experts. Twenty-one chapters give information on all aspects of writing and of preparing copy for publication, whether in print or electronically. New Hart's Rules gives guidance on a broad range of topics including publishing terms, layout and headings, how to treat illustrations, hyphenation, punctuation, and bibliographies and notes. All chapters have been revised and updated to reflect current practice (taking into account changes in the world and in the publishing industry over the last eight years), with the help of a team of experts and consultants. Chapters that have been particularly heavily revised include those dealing with the use and presentation of illustrations, with the conventions of scientific publishing, and with the art of indexing. Additionally, an entirely new chapter has been written to explore and summarize the differences between UK and US English. The text is designed and organized for maximum accessibility with clearly displayed examples throughout. Authoritative and comprehensive, and endorsed by the Society for Editors and Proofreaders, New Hart's Rules is the essential desk guide for all writers and editors. Together with the New Oxford Spelling Dictionary and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors it forms the complete editorial reference set.
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Additional Information

Publisher
OUP Oxford
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Published on
Aug 28, 2014
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Pages
434
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ISBN
9780191649141
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Reference
Reference / General
Reference / Writing Skills
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Who is this book for?

Oxford Practice Grammar is for students of English

at a middle or 'intermediate' level. This means

students who are no longer beginners but who are

not yet expert in English. The book is suitable for

those studying for the Cambridge First Certificate

in English. It can be used by students attending

classes or by someone working alone.

What does the book consist of?

The book consists of 153 units, each on a

grammatical topic. The units cover the main areas

of English grammar. Special attention is given to

those points which are often a problem for learners:

the meaning of the different verb forms, the use of

the passive, conditionals, prepositions and so on.

Many units contrast two or more different

structures such as the present perfect and past

simple (Units 14-15). There are also a number of

review units. The emphasis through the whole

book is on the meaning and use of the forms in

situations. Most units start with a dialogue, or

sometimes a text, which shows how the forms are

used in a realistic context.

There are also 25 tests. These come after each

group of units and cover the area of grammar dealt

with in those units.

Each unit consists of an explanation of the

grammar point followed by a number of exercises.

Almost all units cover two pages. The explanations

are on the left-hand page, and the exercises are on

the right-hand page. There are a few four-page

units, with two pages of explanation and two pages

of exercises.

The examples used to illustrate the

explanations are mostly in everyday conversational

English, except when the structure is more typical

of a formal or written style (e.g. Unit 75B).

There are also appendices on a number of

other topics, including word formation, American

English and irregular verbs.

What's new about this edition?

There have been many changes in both the content

and design of the book.

The number of units has been increased from

120 to 153. There are more two-page units and

fewer four-page units.

The 25 tests are a new feature. There is also a

Starting test to help students find out what

they need to study.

There are many more dialogues and

illustrations on the explanation pages. Many of

the examples and situations are new.

• There are many new exercises and more

different types of exercise.

The number of appendices has been increased

from two to six.

This new edition features a group of characters

whose lives are the basis for many of the

situations in both the explanations and the

exercises. (But you can still do the units in any

order.)

How should the book be used?

There are various ways of using the book. If you

know that you have problems with particular

points of grammar, then you can start with the

relevant units. The contents list and index will help

you find what you want. Or you can do the Starting

test (see page viii) and then use the results to decide

which parts of the book to concentrate on. Or you

can start at the beginning of the book and work

through to the end, although the grammar topics

are not ordered according to their level of difficulty.

When you study a unit, start with the

explanation page and then go on to the exercises.

Often you can study a part of the explanation and

then do one of the exercises. The letter after each

exercise title, e.g. (A), tells you which part of the

explanation the exercise relates to. If you have made

mistakes in your answers to the exercises, look back

at the explanation.

Key to symbols

What about the tests?

There are 25 tests at intervals through the book. You can do a test after you have

worked through a group of units. At the beginning of each test you are told which

units are being tested.

The tests do two things. Firstly, they enable you to find out how well you have

mastered the grammar. (If you get things wrong, you can go back to the relevant

unit or part of a unit.) Secondly, the tests give you practice in handling exam-type

questions. Many of the test questions are similar to those used in the Cambridge

First Certificate Use of English Paper.

What's the best way to learn grammar?

It is usually more effective to look at examples of English rather than to read

statements about it. The explanations of grammar in this book are descriptions of

how English works; they are a guide to help you understand, not 'rules' to be

memorized. The important thing is the language itself. If you are learning about the

present perfect continuous, for example, it is helpful to memorize a sentence like

We've been waiting here for twenty minutes and to imagine a situation at a bus stop

like the one in Unit 16A. The explanation - that the action happens over a period of

time lasting up to the present - is designed to help towards an understanding of the

grammar point. It is not intended that you should write it down or memorize it.

Active learning will help you more than passive reading, so it is important

to do the exercises and to check your answers.

Another way of actively learning grammar is to write down sentences you see

or hear which contain examples of the grammar you are studying. You may come

across such sentences in English books or newspapers, on television or on the

Internet. You may meet English speakers. For example, someone may ask you How

long have you been living here? Later you could note down this sentence as a useful

example of the present perfect continuous. It is also a good idea to collect examples

with a personal relevance like I've been learning English for three years.

The symbol / (oblique stroke) between two words means that either word is

possible. I may/might go means that / may go and I might go are both possible. In

exercise questions this symbol is also used to separate words or phrases which need

to be used in the answer.

Brackets ( ) around a word or phrase mean that it can be left out. There's (some)

milk in the fridge means that there are two possible sentences: There's some milk in

the fridge and There's milk in the fridge.

The symbol ~ means that there is a change of speaker. In the example How are you?

~ I'm fine, thanks, the two sentences are spoken by different people.

The symbol > means that you can go to another place in the book for more

information. > 7 means that you can find out more in Unit 7.

The symbol ► in an exercise means an example.

 

 

Who is this book for?

Oxford Practice Grammar is for students of English

at a middle or 'intermediate' level. This means

students who are no longer beginners but who are

not yet expert in English. The book is suitable for

those studying for the Cambridge First Certificate

in English. It can be used by students attending

classes or by someone working alone.

What does the book consist of?

The book consists of 153 units, each on a

grammatical topic. The units cover the main areas

of English grammar. Special attention is given to

those points which are often a problem for learners:

the meaning of the different verb forms, the use of

the passive, conditionals, prepositions and so on.

Many units contrast two or more different

structures such as the present perfect and past

simple (Units 14-15). There are also a number of

review units. The emphasis through the whole

book is on the meaning and use of the forms in

situations. Most units start with a dialogue, or

sometimes a text, which shows how the forms are

used in a realistic context.

There are also 25 tests. These come after each

group of units and cover the area of grammar dealt

with in those units.

Each unit consists of an explanation of the

grammar point followed by a number of exercises.

Almost all units cover two pages. The explanations

are on the left-hand page, and the exercises are on

the right-hand page. There are a few four-page

units, with two pages of explanation and two pages

of exercises.

The examples used to illustrate the

explanations are mostly in everyday conversational

English, except when the structure is more typical

of a formal or written style (e.g. Unit 75B).

There are also appendices on a number of

other topics, including word formation, American

English and irregular verbs.

What's new about this edition?

There have been many changes in both the content

and design of the book.

The number of units has been increased from

120 to 153. There are more two-page units and

fewer four-page units.

The 25 tests are a new feature. There is also a

Starting test to help students find out what

they need to study.

There are many more dialogues and

illustrations on the explanation pages. Many of

the examples and situations are new.

• There are many new exercises and more

different types of exercise.

The number of appendices has been increased

from two to six.

This new edition features a group of characters

whose lives are the basis for many of the

situations in both the explanations and the

exercises. (But you can still do the units in any

order.)

How should the book be used?

There are various ways of using the book. If you

know that you have problems with particular

points of grammar, then you can start with the

relevant units. The contents list and index will help

you find what you want. Or you can do the Starting

test (see page viii) and then use the results to decide

which parts of the book to concentrate on. Or you

can start at the beginning of the book and work

through to the end, although the grammar topics

are not ordered according to their level of difficulty.

When you study a unit, start with the

explanation page and then go on to the exercises.

Often you can study a part of the explanation and

then do one of the exercises. The letter after each

exercise title, e.g. (A), tells you which part of the

explanation the exercise relates to. If you have made

mistakes in your answers to the exercises, look back

at the explanation.

Key to symbols

What about the tests?

There are 25 tests at intervals through the book. You can do a test after you have

worked through a group of units. At the beginning of each test you are told which

units are being tested.

The tests do two things. Firstly, they enable you to find out how well you have

mastered the grammar. (If you get things wrong, you can go back to the relevant

unit or part of a unit.) Secondly, the tests give you practice in handling exam-type

questions. Many of the test questions are similar to those used in the Cambridge

First Certificate Use of English Paper.

What's the best way to learn grammar?

It is usually more effective to look at examples of English rather than to read

statements about it. The explanations of grammar in this book are descriptions of

how English works; they are a guide to help you understand, not 'rules' to be

memorized. The important thing is the language itself. If you are learning about the

present perfect continuous, for example, it is helpful to memorize a sentence like

We've been waiting here for twenty minutes and to imagine a situation at a bus stop

like the one in Unit 16A. The explanation - that the action happens over a period of

time lasting up to the present - is designed to help towards an understanding of the

grammar point. It is not intended that you should write it down or memorize it.

Active learning will help you more than passive reading, so it is important

to do the exercises and to check your answers.

Another way of actively learning grammar is to write down sentences you see

or hear which contain examples of the grammar you are studying. You may come

across such sentences in English books or newspapers, on television or on the

Internet. You may meet English speakers. For example, someone may ask you How

long have you been living here? Later you could note down this sentence as a useful

example of the present perfect continuous. It is also a good idea to collect examples

with a personal relevance like I've been learning English for three years.

The symbol / (oblique stroke) between two words means that either word is

possible. I may/might go means that / may go and I might go are both possible. In

exercise questions this symbol is also used to separate words or phrases which need

to be used in the answer.

Brackets ( ) around a word or phrase mean that it can be left out. There's (some)

milk in the fridge means that there are two possible sentences: There's some milk in

the fridge and There's milk in the fridge.

The symbol ~ means that there is a change of speaker. In the example How are you?

~ I'm fine, thanks, the two sentences are spoken by different people.

The symbol > means that you can go to another place in the book for more

information. > 7 means that you can find out more in Unit 7.

The symbol ► in an exercise means an example.

 

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