Face, Harmony, and Social Structure: An Analysis of Organizational Behavior Across Cultures

Oxford University Press
Free sample

Face, Harmony, and Social Structure continues author P. Christopher Earley's investigations of the differences among people within organizations in different cultures. The concept of "face," as set forth by Earley, is a reflection of the individual's struggle for self-definition and understanding, of which a key component is a positioning of self relative to others is a social setting. Face is at the heart of social behavior and provides a consistent linking mechanism to understand behavior across cultures. Earley uses this concept of face as a basis for examination of cross-cultural organizational behavior from an individual's personal perspective. In this work, he develops a mid-range theory of individual behavior, self-concept, and interpersonal process in an effort to explain cultural differences in organizational settings. He sets up a cross-level model, and then attempts to provide a single coherent force--"face"--as an engine driving the entire system that can be used to integrate various social and organizational mechanisms in predicting people's behavior. This understanding of how and why people behave certain ways is a critical tool for studying the impact of individual behavior on the functioning of organizations. Earley's work represents a new theory of self-presentation and face within a cross-cultural context, integrating a cross-level approach ranging from the individual to the organization and to the societal levels of discussion. Face, Harmony, and Social Structure is a truly interdisciplinary work that brings elements of psychology, sociology, and anthropology to organizational studies. It will be illuminating reading for professionals and scholars of management and organizational behavior, as well as to academics in cross-cultural psychology and anthropology.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

P. Christopher Earley is Professor of Organization Behavior at the London Business School. He is the author of five books and numerous articles and book chapters, and his most recent publications include Culture, Self-Identity, and Work (Oxford University Press 1993) and The Transplanted Executive: Managing in Different Cultures (Oxford University Press 1997).
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Sep 4, 1997
Read more
Collapse
Pages
256
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780195355048
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Business & Economics / Business Etiquette
Business & Economics / Organizational Behavior
Psychology / Personality
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Embracing the Counterintuitive Side of Collaboration

Think of your to-do list at work. Chances are the most important tasks require you to work with others—and the success of those endeavors depends on the effectiveness of your collaboration.

According to management expert Leigh Thompson, collaboration that is conscious, planned, and focused on generating new ideas builds excitement and produces what she calls a “creative conspiracy.” Teams that conspire to organize themselves, motivate one another, and combine their talents to meet creative challenges are the hallmark of the most successful organizations.

In this book, Thompson reveals the keys to the kind of collaboration that allows teams to reach their full creative potential and maximize their results. She also reveals a host of surprising findings; for example:

• Left to their own devices, teams are less creative than individuals
• Providing “rules” to teams actually increases inventiveness
• Striving for quality results in less creativity than striving for quantity
• Fluctuating membership enhances a team’s innovation
• Most leaders cannot articulate the four basic rules of brainstorming


Thompson combines broad-ranging research with real-life examples to offer strategies and practices designed to help teams and their leaders capitalize on what actually works when it comes to creative collaboration. Creative Conspiracy challenges managers to adopt an unconventional approach to leading teams that, done right, will lead to the creative success of every team—and every organization.
With the passage of NAFTA and GATT, the steady integration of the European Community, and the emergence of promising new markets in Eastern Europe and the Pacific Rim, businesses around the world are globalizing their operations with unprecedented speed. But as executives working in foreign countries have discovered, organizational cultures can differ dramatically from country to country, and management practices effective back home can fail miserably abroad. The Transplanted Executive provides a comprehensive resource for managers of any nationality striving to understand the diversity of workplace values and traditions--and how they can be used to maximize employee efficiency, morale, and the bottom line. Offering sensible solutions to everyday problems, this informative volume shows how employees with different cultural, religious, and ethnic backgrounds respond to specific managerial techniques. The authors demonstrate, for example, why effective incentive systems in Japan might decrease productivity in United States, and why successful efforts to create team-based cooperation in Russia could alienate rather than motivate workers in England. Each chapter focuses on a different management problem--effective communication, motivation of workers, turning groups into teams, leadership skills, and quality management production--and following each chapter are quick reference charts that neatly summarize the text. The authors also include a table which provides cultural profiles of nearly 50 countries from major business centers around the world. Now more than ever, multinational managers need to be in touch with the range of cultural issues that can affect their overseas operations. With The Transplanted Executive in hand, managers the world over will have a user-friendly guide to understanding and mastering the subject.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.