Innovation and Entrepreneurial Networks in Europe

Routledge
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The entrepreneur is involved in the dance of two questions – what is needed and what is possible. The interplay of these two questions is an ongoing process and innovation varies internationally and regionally, depending on differing legal and policy systems, variations in the development of education and skill development, in social processes and in knowledge transfer. This book explores innovation and networks in entrepreneurship with an interdisciplinary approach, focusing on how old and new knowledge can be combined to produce radical innovation.

These chapters combine themes of entrepreneurship, innovation and networks with a specifically European focus, highlighting the wide variations at the national, regional and business level. These variations suggest the need to break with traditional stereotypes about Southern and Northern Europe. The book takes a Schumpeterian perspective, emphasising the importance of looking at the history of entrepreneurship and innovation, paying particular attention to the neglected area of innovation in services within firms.

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About the author

Paloma Fernández Pérez has a PhD in history from the University of California and is Assistant Professor of Economic History at the University of Barcelona. Her research interests are family business, innovation, entrepreneurial networks, and lobbies. She has published El rostro familiar de la metrópolis (Madrid, 1997) and Un siglo y medio de trefilería en España (Barcelona, 2004), has edited with P. Pascual Del metal al motor (Bilbao, 2007), and has published articles in Business History, Enterprise & Society, Business History Review, Revista de Historia Industrial, Revista de Historia Económica, and Investigaciones de Historia Económica. She is principal researcher of a project on entrepreneurial networks in Spain and member of the Centre d ́Estudis Antoni de Capmany.

Mary Rose is Professor of Entrepreneurship in the Institute of Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development in the Management School at Lancaster University, UK. She specialises in evolutionary approaches to innovation and the relationships between innovation, entrepreneurship and communities of practice. She has published widely on the evolution of business values, networking behaviour by family firms and the problem of leadership succession. Publications have included numerous articles in refereed journals and she has authored and co-authored three books and edited nine. With Mike Parsons she co-authored Invisible on Everest: Innovation and the Gear Makers (2003), which was winner of the 2005 Design History Society Prize and runner up for the 2004 Wadsworth Prize.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Aug 19, 2009
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9781135213794
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Corporate & Business History
Business & Economics / Entrepreneurship
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Challenge
Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?

The Study
For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great?

The Standards
Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great? After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world's greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck.

The Comparisons
The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different? Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good?

Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness -- why some companies make the leap and others don't.

The Findings
The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include:

Level 5 Leaders: The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness. The Hedgehog Concept (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence. A Culture of Discipline: When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology. The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.

“Some of the key concepts discerned in the study,” comments Jim Collins, "fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people.”

Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings?

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