Daily Life of the Inuit

ABC-CLIO
Free sample

Daily Life of the Inuit is the first serious study of contemporary Inuit culture and communities from the post-World War II period to the present. Beginning with an introductory essay surveying Inuit prehistory, geography, and contemporary regional diversity, this exhaustive treatment explores the daily life of the Inuit throughout the North American Arctic—in Alaska, Canada, and Greenland.

Twelve thematic chapters acquaint the reader with the daily life of the contemporary Inuit, examining family, intellectual culture, economy, community, politics, technology, religion, popular culture, art, sports and recreation, health, and international engagement. Each chapter begins with a discussion of the historical and cultural underpinnings of Inuit life in the North American Arctic and describes the issues and events relevant to the contemporary Inuit experience. Leading sources are quoted to provide analysis and perspective on the facts presented.

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About the author

Pamela R. Stern, PhD, is adjunct professor of anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
Jun 16, 2010
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Pages
206
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ISBN
9780313363122
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
Social Science / Human Geography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The approximately 150,000 Inuit are indigenous to four nations - Denmark (Greenland), Canada, the United States (Alaska), and Russia - and thus have had very different colonial experiences and participate as citizens of those nations in different ways. Far from being victims of colonialism, Inuit are actively involved in shaping their social environments. Nonetheless, modern social and political realities present Inuit with many of the same issues faced by distinct peoples around the world. This volume describes how Inuit as a single people, citizens of separate nations, and residents of individual communities deal with education, language rights, self-government and self determination, the militarization of their lands and their lives, climate change and pollution, and globalization. This work presents an overview of the Inuit peoples of the Circumpolar North. Unlike other works that focus on traditional Inuit cultures, this work documents the social, political, and economic history of Inuit as part of a globalized world. The work contains information on traditional Inuit cultures, but special emphasis is placed on the recent history of Inuit communities. More than 450 dictionary entries cover issues of society, economy, and politics; influential educators and writers, environmentalists, and politicians; and the many voluntary associations and governmental agencies that have played a role in Inuit history. The introductory essay, chronology, and well-developed bibliography make this an ideal reference source for the researcher or student.
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