Black Oxford: The Untold Stories of Oxford University's Black Scholars

Andrews UK Limited
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Oxford University has attracted and produced many of the world's most original thinkers over the centuries. It boasts heads of states, academics, writers, actors, scientists, philosophers and many other luminaries among its alumni. On any tour of the University and colleges famous ex-students Tony Blair, Bill Clinton, Margaret Thatcher to name a few are often mentioned but what about its Black scholars? The University has a long but little known history of attracting Black scholars from Africa, the Caribbean, America and even Australia since the matriculation in 1873 of Christian Fredrick Cole, who became the first African to practise in an English court. He was followed by other outstanding personalities: Alain Locke, the Father of the Harlem Renaissance and the first Black scholar to be awarded a Rhodes Scholarship in 1907; Kofoworola Moore, the first African woman to graduate from the University in 1935; Eric Williams, the great historian of the Caribbean, who was elected Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago. Oxford s Black alumni include statesmen, lawyers and teachers. More recently, Oxford-educated African American women have risen to high office in the United States. Students from all parts of Africa, the Caribbean and the Commonwealth have made significant contributions and left lasting legacies in the fields of politics, literature, science and the arts. Uncovering the stories of prominent and lesser-known Black students at Oxford, Pamela Roberts reveals a hitherto undocumented strand in the University's history and its relationship with the wider world.
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About the author

Pamela Roberts is a cultural heritage practitioner engaged in promoting independent Black films and filmmakers from the African Diaspora and producing projects which celebrate and acknowledge Black cultural achievements.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Andrews UK Limited
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Published on
Dec 2, 2014
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Pages
172
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ISBN
9781909930148
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Higher
History / Europe / Great Britain
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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From the Trade Paperback edition.
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