Ghosts & Gallows: True Stories of Crime and the Paranormal

The History Press
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A unique compilation of true crime cases with paranormal connections from the mid-18th century to the presentMurder and ghosts go hand-in-hand, and vengeful specters seeking justice or haunting the scene of the crime or their killers have adorned the pages of literature since before Shakespeare. This chilling collection of true-crime tales dating from the mid-18th century to the present all feature some element of the paranormal. Cases include the discovery of a body by a spiritualist medium, a murder solved by a dream of the mother of the victim, and evidence at a Scottish murder trial provided by the ghost of the victim herself. Featuring visions, psychometry, ghosts, haunted prisons, possessions, and spiritualist detectives, this book is a fascinating look at criminology and ghost hunting. Paranormal historian Paul Adams has opened the case files of both the criminologist and the ghost hunter to compile a unique collection of crime from British history.
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About the author

Paul Adams is the coauthor of The Borley Rectory Companion: The Complete Guide toThe Most Haunted House in England and has contributed articles to such publications as Ghost Voices magazine, Paranormal magazine, and Vision magazine.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The History Press
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Published on
Jul 1, 2012
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9780752477350
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Language
English
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Genres
Body, Mind & Spirit / Supernatural
True Crime / Murder / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Michael Novak
What is social justice? For Friedrich Hayek, it was a mirage—a meaningless, ideological, incoherent, vacuous cliché. He believed the term should be avoided, abandoned, and allowed to die a natural death. For its proponents, social justice is a catchall term that can be used to justify any progressive-sounding government program. It endures because it venerates its champions and brands its opponents as supporters of social injustice, and thus as enemies of humankind. As an ideological marker, social justice always works best when it is not too sharply defined.

In Social Justice Isn’t What You Think It Is, Michael Novak and Paul Adams seek to clarify the true meaning of social justice and to rescue it from its ideological captors. In examining figures ranging from Antonio Rosmini, Abraham Lincoln, and Hayek, to Popes Leo XIII, John Paul II, and Francis, the authors reveal that social justice is not a synonym for “progressive” government as we have come to believe. Rather, it is a virtue rooted in Catholic social teaching and developed as an alternative to the unchecked power of the state. Almost all social workers see themselves as progressives, not conservatives. Yet many of their “best practices” aim to empower families and local communities. They stress not individual or state, but the vast social space between them. Left and right surprisingly meet.

In this surprising reintroduction of its original intention, social justice represents an immensely powerful virtue for nurturing personal responsibility and building the human communities that can counter the widespread surrender to an ever-growing state.
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