Written in Blood: A Cultural History of the British Vampire

The History Press
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A modern guide to vampires, where every page is truly written in bloodVampires, those chilling supernatural creatures of the night—do they really exist? The British Isles has a remarkable association with the realms of the undead, from the 19th-century world of Croglin Grange, Varney the Vampire, and Bram Stoker's Dracula, through to Hammer Films and the modern phenomenon of the Highgate Vampire. In this thought-provoking book, illustrated with many never before seen photographs, and drawing on extensive original research, paranormal historian Paul Adams explores the history of British vampirism in both fact and fiction.
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About the author

Paul Adams is the author of a number of books, including Ghost & Gallows, and has also contributed articles to Ghost Voices, Paranormal, and Vision magazines, among others.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The History Press
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Published on
Jul 1, 2014
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780750957458
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Great Britain
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Michael Novak
What is social justice? For Friedrich Hayek, it was a mirage—a meaningless, ideological, incoherent, vacuous cliché. He believed the term should be avoided, abandoned, and allowed to die a natural death. For its proponents, social justice is a catchall term that can be used to justify any progressive-sounding government program. It endures because it venerates its champions and brands its opponents as supporters of social injustice, and thus as enemies of humankind. As an ideological marker, social justice always works best when it is not too sharply defined.

In Social Justice Isn’t What You Think It Is, Michael Novak and Paul Adams seek to clarify the true meaning of social justice and to rescue it from its ideological captors. In examining figures ranging from Antonio Rosmini, Abraham Lincoln, and Hayek, to Popes Leo XIII, John Paul II, and Francis, the authors reveal that social justice is not a synonym for “progressive” government as we have come to believe. Rather, it is a virtue rooted in Catholic social teaching and developed as an alternative to the unchecked power of the state. Almost all social workers see themselves as progressives, not conservatives. Yet many of their “best practices” aim to empower families and local communities. They stress not individual or state, but the vast social space between them. Left and right surprisingly meet.

In this surprising reintroduction of its original intention, social justice represents an immensely powerful virtue for nurturing personal responsibility and building the human communities that can counter the widespread surrender to an ever-growing state.
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