The Foundling: The True Story of a Kidnapping, a Family Secret, and My Search for the Real Me

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This is the inspiring and “page-turning” (Booklist) true story of Paul Fronczak, a man who recently discovered that he had been kidnapped as a baby—and how his quest to find out who he really is upturned the genealogy industry, his own family, and set in motion the second longest cold-case in US history.

In 1964, a woman pretending to be a nurse kidnapped an infant boy named Paul Fronczak from a Chicago hospital.

Two years later, police found a boy abandoned outside a variety store in New Jersey. The FBI tracked down Dora Fronczak, the kidnapped infant’s mother, and she identified the abandoned boy as her son. The family spent the next fifty years believing they were whole again—but Paul was always unsure about his true identity.

Then, four years ago—spurred on by the birth of his first child, Emma Faith—Paul took a DNA test. The test revealed that he was definitely not Paul Fronczak. From that moment on, Paul has been on a tireless mission to find the man whose life he’s been living—and to discover who abandoned him, and why.

Poignant and inspiring, The Foundling is a story about a child lost and a faith found, about the permanence of families and the bloodlines that define you, and about the emotional toll of both losing your identity and rediscovering who you truly are.
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About the author

Paul Joseph Fronczak works for a non-profit organization dedicated to saving lives. He has worked at several colleges, helping people better themselves through education. Paul is a former actor and avid motorcyclist, and he has played bass guitar in several bands. He loves hanging out with his young daughter Emma Faith in Las Vegas, where they live. The Foundling is Paul’s first book.

Alex Tresniowski is a former human-interest writer at People and the bestselling author of several books, most notably The Vendetta, which was purchased by Universal Studios and used as a basis for the movie Public Enemies. His other titles include An Invisible Thread, Waking Up in Heaven, and The Light Between Us.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Apr 4, 2017
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9781501142147
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Entertainment & Performing Arts
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Biography & Autobiography / Religious
True Crime / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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