When Breath Becomes Air

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST • This inspiring, exquisitely observed memoir finds hope and beauty in the face of insurmountable odds as an idealistic young neurosurgeon attempts to answer the question What makes a life worth living?

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • People • NPR • The Washington Post • Slate • Harper’s Bazaar • Time Out New York • Publishers Weekly • BookPage

Finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction and the Books for a Better Life Award in Inspirational Memoir

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir.

Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both.
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Пол Каланити – талантливый врач-нейрохирург, и он с таким же успехом мог бы стать талантливым писателем. Вы держите в руках его единственную книгу.Более десяти лет он учился на нейрохирурга и всего полтора года отделяли его от того, чтобы стать профессором. Он уже получал хорошие предложения работы, у него была молодая жена и совсем чуть-чуть оставалось до того, как они наконец-то начнут настоящую жизнь, которую столько лет откладывали на потом.Полу было всего 36 лет, когда смерть, с которой он боролся в операционной, постучалась к нему самому. Диагноз – рак легких, четвертая стадия – вмиг перечеркнул всего его планы.Кто, как не сам врач, лучше всего понимает, что ждет больного с таким диагнозом? Пол не опустил руки, он начал жить! Он много времени проводил с семьей, они с женой родили прекрасную дочку Кэди, реализовалась мечта всей его жизни – он начал писать книгу, и он стал профессором нейрохирургии.У ВАС В РУКАХ КНИГА ВЕЛИКОГО ПИСАТЕЛЯ, УСПЕВШЕГО НАПИСАТЬ ВСЕГО ОДНУ КНИГУ. ЭТУ КНИГУ!
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Additional Information

Publisher
Random House
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Published on
Jan 12, 2016
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9780812988413
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Philosophy / Mind & Body
Social Science / Death & Dying
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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