Infernal Triangle: Conflict in Iraq, Afghanistan and The Levant - Eyewitness reports from the September 11 decade

Allen & Unwin
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It's been ten years since Al-Qaeda demolished the World Trade Center in New York on 11 September 2001. One of the most pivotal events in the last fifty years, it was a dramatic moment in which, having previously vanquished the threat of Russian Communism, the USA discovered that it had a new enemy to confront - Islamic extremism. And so began the September 11 decade. Paul McGeough was in the streets of Manhattan on that fateful day in September 2001. No journalist has monitored more closely the fallout from those destructive minutes - for Afghanistan, for Iraq and for the never-ending conflict between Israel and the Palestinians in The Levant. Together, these three locations are the Infernal Triangle, from which America has been unable to extricate itself. McGeough has enjoyed access to all the main players in these unfolding events. But, more than that, he has been prepared to observe at close quarters both the fighters and the citizens involved, recording their hopes and fears, their triumphs and tragedies. He has been present at the death of colleagues; he joined the historic 'Peace Flotilla' that attempted to bring supplies to Gaza.

Through his vivid and eloquent journalism, we gain new insights into some of the most critical events of the last decade.
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About the author

Paul McGeough is the author of Kill Khalid, In Baghdad - A Reporter's War and Manhattan to Baghdad: Despatches from the Frontline in the War on Terror. McGeough's many domestic and international journalism awards attest to his position as Australia's most prominent foreign correspondent - Kill Khalid won the 2010 NSW Book of the Year award. McGeough has twice been named Australian Journalist of the Year and in 2002 his reporting from Afghanistan was acknowledged by the awarding of a Johns Hopkins University-based SAIS Novartis prize for excellence in international journalism.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Allen & Unwin
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
338
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ISBN
9781742693804
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Middle East / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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"David Enders has a stunning independent streak and the courage to trust his own perceptions as he reports from outside the bubble Americans have created for themselves in Iraq."
---Joe Sacco, author of Safe Area Gorazde

"Baghdad Bulletin takes us where mainstream news accounts do not go. Disrupting the easy cliché s that dominate U.S. journalism, Enders blows away the media fog of war. The result is a book that challenges Americans to see through double speak and reconsider the warfare being conducted in their names."
---Norman Solomon, author of War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death

"Journalism at its finest and on a shoestring to boot. David Enders shows that courage and honesty can outshine big-budget mainstream media. Wry but self-critical, Baghdad Bulletin tells a story that a few of us experienced but every journalist, nay every citizen, should read."
---Pratap Chatterjee, Managing Editor and Project Director, CorpWatch

"Young and tenacious, Dave Enders went, saw, and wrote it down. Here it is-a well-informed and detailed tale of Iraq's decline under American rule. Baghdad Bulletin offers tragic politics, wacky people, and keen insights about what really matters on the ground in Iraq."
---Christian Parenti

"I wrote my first piece for Baghdad Bulletin after visiting the mass graves at Al-Hilla in 2003. The Baghdad Bulletin was essential reading in the first few months after the end of the war. I handed that particular copy to Prime Minister Tony Blair. I am only sorry that I cannot read it anymore. David Enders and his team were brave, enterprising, and idealistic."
---Rt. Hon. Ann Clwyd, member of the British Parliament


Baghdad Bulletin is a street-level account of the war and turbulent postwar period as seen through the eyes of the young independent journalist David Enders. The book recounts Enders's story of his decision to go to Iraq, where he opened the only English-language newspaper completely written, printed, and distributed there during the war.

Young, courageous, and anti-authoritarian, Enders is the first reporter to cover the war as experienced by ordinary Iraqis. Deprived of the press credentials that gave his embedded colleagues access to press conferences and officially sanitized information, Enders tells the story of a different war, outside the Green Zone. It is a story in which the struggle of everyday life is interspersed with moments of sheer terror and bizarre absurdity: wired American troops train their guns on terrified civilians; Iraqi musicians prepare a recital for Coalition officials who never show; traveling clowns wreak havoc in a Baghdad police station.

Orphans and intellectuals, activists and insurgents: Baghdad Bulletin depicts the unseen complexity of Iraqi society and gives us a powerful glimpse of a new kind of warfare, one that coexists with-and sometimes tragically veers into-the everyday rhythms of life.
“Meticulously researched . . . This is the definitive chronicle of the Middle East crisis during the Clinton years and in the post-9/11 era” (Publishers Weekly).
 
“Providing a fly-on-the-wall vantage of the rising diplomatic panic that sent shudders through world capitals,” Kill Khalid unfolds as a masterpiece of investigative journalism (Toronto Star). In 1997, the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad poisoned Hamas leader Khalid Mishal in broad daylight on the streets of Amman, Jordan. As the little-known Palestinian leader slipped into a coma, the Mossad agents’ escape was bungled and the episode quickly spiraled into a diplomatic crisis. A series of high-stakes negotiations followed, which ultimately saved Mishal and set the stage for his phenomenal political ascendancy.
 
In Kill Khalid, acclaimed reporter Paul McGeough reconstructs the history of Hamas through exclusive interviews with key players across the Middle East and in Washington, including unprecedented access to Mishal himself, who remains to this day one of the most powerful and enigmatic figures in the region. A “sobering reminder of how little has been achieved during 60 years of Israeli efforts in Palestine,” Kill Khalid tracks Hamas’s political fortunes across a decade of suicide bombings, political infighting, and increasing public support, culminating in the battle for Gaza in 2007 and the current-day political stalemate (Kirkus Reviews, starred review).
 
“A pacey, riveting, and controversial book that has all the compulsion of a Le Carré novel.” —John F. Burns, The New York Times
 
“[A] gem of leave-no-stone-unturned reporting.” —Foreign Affairs
From leadership expert, former Navy SEAL, "American Grit" feature player, and author of Worth Dying For: A Navy SEAL's Call to a Nation, Rorke Denver, the bestselling account of how he helped create the U.S. Navy SEALS of today. Rorke Denver trains the men who become Navy SEALs--the most creative problem solvers on the modern battlefield, ideal warriors for the kinds of wars America is fighting now. With his years of action-packed mission experience and a top training role, Lieutenant Commander Denver understands exactly how tomorrow's soldiers are recruited, sculpted, motivated, and deployed.

Now, Denver takes you inside his personal story and the fascinating, demanding SEAL training program he now oversees. He recounts his experience evolving from a young SEAL hopeful pushing his way through Hell Week, into a warrior engaging in dangerous stealth missions across the globe, and finally into a lieutenant commander directing the indoctrination, requalification programs, and the "Hero or Zero" missions his SEALs undertake.

From his own SEAL training and missions overseas, Denver details how the SEALs' creative operations became front and center in America's War on Terror-and how they are altering warfare everywhere. In fourteen years as a SEAL officer, Rorke Denver tangled with drug lords in Latin America, stood up to violent mobs in Liberia, and battled terrorists in Iraq and Afghanistan. Leading 200 commando missions, he earned the Bronze Star with V for valor. He has also served as flag aide to the admiral in charge and spent the past four years as executive officer of the Navy Special Warfare Center's Advanced Training Command in Coronado, California, directing all phases of the basic and advanced training that prepare men for war in SEAL teams. He recently starred in the film Act of Valor. He is married and has two daughters.

Ellis Henican is a columnist at Newsday and an on-air commentator at the Fox News Channel. He has written two recent New York Times bestsellers, Home Team with New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton and In the Blink of an Eye with NASCAR legend Michael Waltrip.

With all the SEALs' recent successes, we have been getting a level of acclaim we're not used to. But something important has been missing in this warm burst of publicity . Correcting that is my mission here.
My own SEAL dream was launched by a book. My hope is that this one teaches lessons that go far beyond the battlefield, inspiring a fresh generation of warriors to carry on that dream.
-Lieutenant Commander Rorke Denver
On September 11, Paul McGeough stood transfixed on the streets of downtown Manhattan. Only a month earlier he had been in Afghanistan, reporting on the humanitarian crisis gripping the country under Taliban rule. Now he was forced to run for his life as the World Trade Center's second tower collapsed in a cloud of smoke and debris.

Foreign correspondents are forever on the road, but few find themselves in the right place at the right time as often as Paul McGeough. Within weeks of George W. Bush's declaration of the War on Terror, he was back in Afghanistan, reporting from the trenches on the US-led war against Osama bin Laden and the Taliban. What followed was twelve months hurtling around the globe, from shattered New York to the frontlines of war-torn Central Asia and the mess of the Middle East. He returned to New York for the anniversary of the terrorist attacks, and then it was back to Baghdad.

During that year he saw three colleagues killed in a Taliban ambush. He visited poverty-stricken villages and the lavish offices of Iraqi politicians. He interviewed Northern Alliance commanders, families of suicide bombers and families of September 11 victims. He was the house guest of an Afghan warlord and an unwelcome visitor to the Jenin refugee camp, destroyed by Israeli forces.

Dramatic, poignant and powerful, Manhattan to Baghdad provides an eyewitness account of the first year of the first major war in the new millennium. It is essential reading for a better understanding of the seismic changes taking place in the world we thought we knew.
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