My Brother's Madness: A Memoir

Northwestern University Press
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My Brother's Madness is based on the author's relationship with his brother-who had a psychotic breakdown in his late forties-and explores the unfolding of two intertwined lives and the nature of delusion. Circumstances lead one brother from juvenile crime on the streets of Brooklyn to war-torn Vietnam, to a fast-track life as a Hollywood publicist and to owning and operating The Tin Palace, one of New York's most legendary jazz clubs, while his brother falls into, and fights his way back from, a delusional psychosis.

My Brother's Madness is part thriller, part exploration that not only describes the causes, character, and journey of mental illness, but also makes sense of it. It is ultimately a story of our own humanity, and answers the question, Am I my brother's keeper?

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About the author

Paul Pines grew up in New York City and is the author of five books of poetry, including his most recent, Adrift on Blinding Light. His novel, The Tin Angel, was critically very well received. He currently lives with his wife Carol and daughter Charlotte in Glens Falls, New York, where he teaches American literature and creative writing at Adirondack Community College, practices psychotherapy at Glens Falls Hospital, and hosts the annual Lake George Jazz Weekend.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Northwestern University Press
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Published on
Oct 1, 2007
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Pages
318
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ISBN
9780810132993
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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