La prisión y las instituciones punitivas en la investigación histórica: The Prison and the Punitive Institutions at the Historical Research

Universidad de Castilla La Mancha
3

La Historia Social de las Instituciones Punitivas está necesitada en España de encuentro y debate, de confrontación y colaboración entre investigadores e investigadoras. Solo así logrará hacerse visible e inteligible como tendencia historiográfica y sobre todo como apuesta teórico-metodológica, porque de hecho ya es más que creíble como práctica historiográfica.
Aquí, en este libro, junto a los logros también se perfilan las carencias y los retos más acuciantes. Lejos de buscar una autonomía extemporánea, la Historia Social de las Instituciones Punitivas quiere buscar su propia viabilidad a base de intersecciones y buenas mezclas.
Esos objetivos se planteaba el Grupo de Estudio sobre la Historia de la Prisión y las Instituciones Punitivas (GEHPIP) ―un equipo interuniversitario y con sede en la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM)― al organizar lo que de forma homónima decidió titular I Congreso Internacional sobre Historia de la Prisión y las Instituciones Punitivas, celebrado en Ciudad Real entre el 10 y el 12 de abril de 2013. El libro electrónico que aquí se presenta es una buena muestra de lo que allí se comunicó y discutió.
Social History of Punitive Institutions in Spain needs meetings and discussions, comparison and collaboration between researchers. Only then it will become visible and intelligible as a historiographical trend and, above all, as a theoretical-methodological hope, because in fact, now it is more than conceivable as a historiographical practice.
Here in this book are outlined, along with the achievements, the shortcomings and the most pressing challenges. Far from seeking an extemporaneous autonomy, Social History of Punitive Institutions wants to try to find its own feasibility based on intersections and good mixings.
Those objectives were considered by the Study Group about History of Prison and Punitive Institutions (Grupo de Estudio sobre la Historia de la Prisión y las Instituciones Punitivas, GEHPIP) –an interuniversity team and with central office at Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM)– when organising what it decided to name in an homonymous way 1st International Congress on History of Prison and Punitive Institutions (I Congreso Internacional sobre Historia de la Prisión y las Instituciones Punitivas), held in Ciudad Real (Spain) from 10 to 12 April 2013. The electronic book here presented is a good example of what it was told and discussed there.


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Publisher
Universidad de Castilla La Mancha
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Published on
Sep 23, 2014
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Pages
922
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ISBN
9788490440872
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Research
Social Science / Penology
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This content is DRM protected.
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