Peering Through the Sands of Time: The Archeology of the Caddo at the Kitchen Branch Site (41CP220) in East Texas

The Texas Department of Transportation and AmaTerra Environmental, Inc.
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Explore the rich cultural heritage and history of the Caddo in northeast Texas through the archeological excavations of the Kitchen Branch site (41CP220), a late Titus Phase occupation (15th through 17th Centuries A.D.) site in Camp County. Who are the Caddo and why were they so influential in Texas history and prehistory? Archeologists working on behalf of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) use the materials the prehistoric Caddo left behind to narrate one small part of their story. Immerse yourself in the excavations of a Caddo homestead.  

Discussions focus on Caddo ceramics and the rich ceramic-making tradition that contributes to their heritage. Learn how the Caddo made pots for everyday use as well as special, ceremonial occasions. See photos of actual vessels recovered from other sites in the region and virtual three-dimensional models of both archeological and modern analogs. Includes a detailed, illustrated glossary of terms. 

This is a direct PDF export of a fully-interactive electronic document of the same name available for iPad and Mac computer devices through the iTunes Store.  Interactive components are therefore not preserved.

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Additional Information

Publisher
The Texas Department of Transportation and AmaTerra Environmental, Inc.
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Published on
Dec 30, 2014
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Pages
115
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Antiques & Collectibles / Pottery & Ceramics
Architecture / History / Prehistoric & Primitive
Art / Ceramics
Art / History / Ancient & Classical
Art / Native American
History / Americas (North, Central, South, West Indies)
History / Native American
History / United States / State & Local / Southwest (AZ, NM, OK, TX)
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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