Style: In Defence Of... Metabolism

Machine Books
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This series is about style.

Philosopher Georg Lukacs described the style of a piece of work as the attempt to reproduce one's view of the world within it. Looked at in this way, he says, style ceases to be a formalistic category but rather, “it is rooted in content; it is the specific form of a specific content.” After all, style is not technique, but ought to convey an intention. Sociologist Georg Simmel said that style is the aesthetic attempt to provide a “unifying encompassing context”.

This series is about the content and context of style.

Undoubtedly, it will irritate and enthuse but it is intended to be a fillip for our contemporary era in which style is often equated with fashion - where style can be dismissed in order to avoid dealing with its essence. Therefore these essays are not style over substance, but the very substance of style.

The De Stijl manifesto of 1918 argued that the liberal arts should engage in a dialogue to create a new “wisdom of life”. The robustness of these essays suggests that such an ambition still resonates. Such an exchange can still appear vital and captivating.

Each Style: In Defence Of… confronts us with new ideas for contemplation and critique. We hope that minds might be open to critically engage with each of these polemical bulletins. In so doing, we might reasonably formulate what we stand for.

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Publisher
Machine Books
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Published on
Feb 15, 2016
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Pages
14
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The revered architectural reference, updated with contemporary examples and interactive 3D models

The Interactive Resource Center is an online learning environment where instructors and students can access the tools they need to make efficient use of their time, while reinforcing and assessing their understanding of key concepts for successful understanding of the course. An access card with redemption code for the online Interactive Resource Center is included with all new, print copies or can be purchased separately.    (***If you rent or purchase a used book with an access code, the access code may have been redeemed previously and you may have to purchase a new access code -ISBN: 9781118986837).

The online Interactive Resource Center contains resources tied to the book, such as:

Interactive Animations highlighting key concepts Photo Gallery of architectural precedents illustrated in the book Flashcards for focused learning

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Essential and timeless, the fundamental elements of space and form still present a challenge to those who crave a deeper understanding. Taking a critical look at the evolution of spaces, Architecture distills complex concepts of design into a clear focus that inspires, bringing difficult abstractions to life. The book is illustrated throughout to demonstrate the concepts presented, and show the relationships between fundamental elements of architecture through the ages and across cultures. Topics include:

Primary elements and the principles of space design Form and space, including light, view, openings, and enclosures Organization of space, and the elements and relationships of circulation Proportion and scale, including proportioning systems and anthropometry
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Contributors
Melissa Checker, Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Daniel Aldana Cohen, University of Pennsylvania; Els de Graauw, Baruch College, City University of New York; Kathleen Dunn, Loyola University Chicago
Shannon Gleeson, Cornell University; Miriam Greenberg, University of California, Santa Cruz; Alejandro Grimson, Universidad de San Martín (Argentina); Andrew Herod, University of Georgia; Penny Lewis, Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, City University of New York; Stephanie Luce, Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, City University of New York; Lize Mogel, artist and coeditor of An Atlas of Radical Cartography; Gretchen Purser, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

Urban public spaces, from the streets and squares of Buenos Aires to Zuccotti Park in New York City, have become the emblematic sites of contentious politics in the twenty-first century. As the contributors to The City Is the Factory argue, this resurgent politics of the square is itself part of a broader shift in the primary locations and targets of popular protest from the workplace to the city. This shift is due to an array of intersecting developments: the concentration of people, profit, and social inequality in growing urban areas; the attacks on and precarity faced by unions and workers' movements; and the sense of possibility and actual leverage afforded by local politics and the tactical use of urban space. Thus, "the city"—from the town square to the banlieu—is becoming like the factory of old: a site of production and profit-making as well as new forms of solidarity, resistance, and social reimagining.We see examples of the city as factory in new place-based political alliances, as workers and the unemployed find common cause with "right to the city" struggles. Demands for jobs with justice are linked with demands for the urban commons—from affordable housing to a healthy environment, from immigrant rights to "urban citizenship" and the right to streets free from both violence and racially biased policing. The case studies and essays in The City Is the Factory provide descriptions and analysis of the form, substance, limits, and possibilities of these timely struggles.

Contributors
Melissa Checker, Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Daniel Aldana Cohen, University of Pennsylvania; Els de Graauw, Baruch College, City University of New York; Kathleen Dunn, Loyola University Chicago
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The goal of this book is to begin to present the fundamental body of knowledge which informs current approaches in complimentary and alternative medicine and to explore the role of the new professions of integrative holistic health practitioner, consultant and administrator. This book is designed to compliment, enhance, deepen and broaden the reader's existing expertise through an integrative approach which will improve his/her ability to consult, design programs and work in a variety of settings with various populations including those with medical and psychological conditions as well as those who wish to support their health and well-being. The book provides the necessary conceptual foundational frameworks for exploring how practitioners in a field of alternative medicine/holistic health know what they know in support of their work. These core ways of knowing gives them a foundation for evaluating their work, new advances in the field and affords them interrelated frames of knowledge for their continued research, expansion and integrative work in the field. Trained holistic health practitioners who may have applied one or more of these paradigms may now be able to expand their foundational and conceptual base thereby broadening their theory and techniques that are appropriate to their professional arenas. Section I is designed to explore general ways of knowing and meaning making in holistic health. Section II is designed to offer the reader/practitioner methodology regarding the creation and implementation of holistic health centers, programs and integrated consultation practices. Finally, Section III offers examples of integrative holistic health clinicians who combine and synthesize a variety of holistic health approaches and paradigms into their practices as practitioners, healers, therapists and consultants.
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