A Silent Revolution?: Gender and Wealth in English Canada, 1860-1930

McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Peter Baskerville situates women in their immediate gendered and familial environments as well as within broader legal, financial, spatial, temporal, and historiographical contexts. He analyses women's probates, wills, land ownership, holdings of real and chattel mortgages, investment in stocks and bonds, and self employment, revealing that women controlled wealth to an extent similar to that of most men and invested and managed wealth in increasingly similar, and in some cases more aggressive, ways.
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About the author

One of Canada's leading business social scientists, Peter Baskerville is professor of history, University of Victoria, in-coming chair of Modern Western Canadian History, University of Alberta, and the author of several books, including, with Eric Sager, Unwilling Idlers: The Urban Unemployed and Their Families in Late Victorian Canada.

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Additional Information

Publisher
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Published on
Jul 21, 2008
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9780773577275
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Peter Baskerville
Collective histories and broad social change are informed by the ways in which personal lives unfold. Lives in Transition examines individual experiences within such collective histories during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This collection brings together sources from Europe, North America, and Australia in order to advance the field of quantitative longitudinal historical research. The essays examine the lives and movements of various populations over time that were important for Europe and its overseas settlements - including the experience of convicts transported to Australia and Scots who moved freely to New Zealand. The micro-level roots of economic change and social mobility of settler society are analyzed through populations studies of Chicago, Montreal, as well as rural communities in Canada and the United States. Several studies also explore ethnic inequality as experienced by Polish immigrants, French-Canadians, and Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Lives in Transition demonstrates how the analysis of collective experience through both individual-level and large-scale data at different moments in history opens up important avenues for social science and historical research. Contributors include Luiza Antonie (Guelph), Peter Baskerville (Alberta), Kandace Bogaert (McMaster), John Cranfield (Guelph), Gordon Darroch (York), Allegra Fryxell (Cambridge), Ann Herring (McMaster), Kris Inwood (Guelph), Rebecca Kippen (Melbourne), Rebecca Lenihan (Guelph), Susan Hautaniemi Leonard (Michigan), Hamish Maxwell-Stewart (Tasmania), Janet McCalman (Melbourne), Evan Roberts (Minnesota), J. Andrew Ross (Guelph), Sherry Olson (McGill), Ken Sylvester (Michigan), Jane van Koeverden (Waterloo), Aaron Van Tassel (Western).
Peter Baskerville
Collective histories and broad social change are informed by the ways in which personal lives unfold. Lives in Transition examines individual experiences within such collective histories during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This collection brings together sources from Europe, North America, and Australia in order to advance the field of quantitative longitudinal historical research. The essays examine the lives and movements of various populations over time that were important for Europe and its overseas settlements - including the experience of convicts transported to Australia and Scots who moved freely to New Zealand. The micro-level roots of economic change and social mobility of settler society are analyzed through populations studies of Chicago, Montreal, as well as rural communities in Canada and the United States. Several studies also explore ethnic inequality as experienced by Polish immigrants, French-Canadians, and Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Lives in Transition demonstrates how the analysis of collective experience through both individual-level and large-scale data at different moments in history opens up important avenues for social science and historical research. Contributors include Luiza Antonie (Guelph), Peter Baskerville (Alberta), Kandace Bogaert (McMaster), John Cranfield (Guelph), Gordon Darroch (York), Allegra Fryxell (Cambridge), Ann Herring (McMaster), Kris Inwood (Guelph), Rebecca Kippen (Melbourne), Rebecca Lenihan (Guelph), Susan Hautaniemi Leonard (Michigan), Hamish Maxwell-Stewart (Tasmania), Janet McCalman (Melbourne), Evan Roberts (Minnesota), J. Andrew Ross (Guelph), Sherry Olson (McGill), Ken Sylvester (Michigan), Jane van Koeverden (Waterloo), Aaron Van Tassel (Western).
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