Gesammelte Werke (Über 570 Titel in einem Buch - Vollständige Ausgaben): Als ich noch der Waldbauernbub war + Waldheimat + Die Schriften des Waldschulmeisters + Jakob der Letzte + Der Gottsucher + Heidepeters Gabriel und mehr

e-artnow
1
Free sample

Dieses eBook: "Gesammelte Werke (Über 570 Titel in einem Buch - Vollständige Ausgaben)" ist mit einem detaillierten und dynamischen Inhaltsverzeichnis versehen und wurde sorgfältig korrekturgelesen. Peter Rosegger (1843-1918) war ein österreichischer Schriftsteller und Poet. Er verwendete auch die Pseudonyme P. K., Petri Kettenfeier und Hans Malser. In seiner Zeitschrift Heimgarten veröffentlichte er zahlreiche Beiträge zu gesellschaftlichen und sozialen Fragen. Dabei zeigte er sich als Befürworter eines „einfachen Lebens“ und nahm häufig eine zivilisationskritische Sichtweise ein. Rosegger war sehr aufgeschlossen gegenüber reformerischen Bewegungen seiner Zeit, wie etwa dem Vegetarismus, der Alternativmedizin oder der Abstinenzbewegung. Er beschäftigte sich auch mit Buddhismus und unterstützte den damals gerade aufkommenden Naturschutz-Gedanken. Inhalt: Romane: Die Schriften des Waldschulmeisters Heidepeters Gabriel Der Gottsucher Jakob der Letzte Peter Mayr Erzählungen: Als ich noch der Waldbauernbub war Waldheimat Die Abelsberger Chronik Nixnutzig Volk Sonnenschein Die Sennerin und ihre Freunde Der Höllbart Das Geschichtenbuch des Wanderers Das Ereignis in der Schrun Das Sünderglöckel Die Waldbauern Der junge Geldmacher Der Pfingstlotter Die heilige Weihnachtszeit Erste Weihnachten in der Waldheimat Weihnacht in Winkelsteg Gedichte: Mein Lied Liebe Welt Hölle Himmel Heimat: Das Mutterherz Mein Vaterhaus Ich bin ein armer Hirtenknab'! Ich bin daheim auf waldiger Flur Kindesgebet Das Kind in seiner jungen Zeit Mein süßes Kind, du weißt noch nicht Zum Weihnachtsbaum Einst wirst du die Träne fliehen Die Erweckung Es kann einem wunderlich träumen Ich bin ein großer Herre! Habt Dank, ihr guten Leute! Amors Arsenal Und sie gefielen mir beide Eine Jungfrau wollt' er suchen Das bestohlene Hannchen Die Einfältigen Er will mich nicht verstehen Der Stern im See Deine schönen Augen Zur Rosenblühzeit Wenn ich der Himmel wär' Weißt du, Mädchen, daß ich sterbe?...
Read more
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
e-artnow
Read more
Published on
Sep 25, 2015
Read more
Pages
5800
Read more
ISBN
9788026844921
Read more
Language
German
Read more
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Fiction / Biographical
Fiction / Romance / Collections & Anthologies
Literary Collections / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Diese Ausgabe von "Peter Rosegger - Mein Lied" wurde mit einem funktionalen Layout erstellt und sorgfältig formatiert. Peter Rosegger (1843-1918) war ein österreichischer Schriftsteller und Poet. Er verwendete auch die Pseudonyme P. K., Petri Kettenfeier und Hans Malser. Inhalt: Heimat: Das Mutterherz Mein Vaterhaus Ich bin ein armer Hirtenknab'! Ich bin daheim auf waldiger Flur Kindesgebet Das Kind in seiner jungen Zeit Mein süßes Kind, du weißt noch nicht Zum Weihnachtsbaum Einst wirst du die Träne fliehen Die Erweckung Es kann einem wunderlich träumen Ich bin ein großer Herre! Habt Dank, ihr guten Leute! Ich will nichts von dir Urwaldstimmung Wenn alle Wälder schlafen Ruh' im Walde Wollte heim in meine Berge Alpenrose — Edelweiß Meine Lust ist Leben Gruß aus Italien an die Heimat Vergib mir, o Süden! Ein Freund ging nach Amerika Daheim! Wir grüßen dich! Steiermark Echte Tracht Singet, jauchzet eure Lieder! Dem Heimatlande Ein Lied, ein Schwert und einen Gott! Heimatsegen Gebet Liebe: Amors Arsenal Und sie gefielen mir beide Eine Jungfrau wollt' er suchen Das bestohlene Hannchen Die Einfältigen Er will mich nicht verstehen Der Stern im See Deine schönen Augen Zur Rosenblühzeit Wenn ich der Himmel wär' Weißt du, Mädchen, daß ich sterbe? Wenn ich durch den Winter geh' Frage Was du dir denkst Waldabenteuer Der Verlassenen Fluch Amor, dieser Wicht Diese Mädels! Belehrung für einen Dichter Amors Rat Gewohnheit Schon dreißig Jahre bin ich alt! Hölle: Eines Sünders Reuelieder Herr Graf, du hast mich lieb gehabt Neuer Sang mit altem Klang Ein Streitgesang Gott und Volk gehört zusammen An die Naturalisten Leute gibt es allerlei Der Schwindel an das Publikum Der Besessene Der Reiche Der Übermensch Die Dichter und die Leute Unterricht für moderne Poeten Des Sängers Verzweiflung Eine Stimme in der Wüste..."
Example in this ebook


Rosegger: An Appreciation

The unmistakable trend of our time is the civilisation—which, in its modern form, is largely urbanisation—of the whole habitable globe. From its centres outwards it is thrusting itself upon places, men, processes—ultimate sanctuaries, never before reached by alien trespassing. Most men are looking on at its destruction of the old order with shrugging acceptance of the inevitable, or hailing the chaotic stuff of the new in its making with so far unjustified joy. With a wit worn somewhat threadbare with use they invariably counsel the few eccentrics who deny its inevitability and question its beneficence to quit the hopes and mops of Mrs. Partington for the discreet submission of the wiser Canute. Then they grow properly grave, and declare that this modern civilisation, for all its shortcomings, has been well described as a banquet, the like of which, for those below as for those above the salt, has never been spread before. However that may be, there is no question that here and there a guest is sometimes moved to look round on the company and scan its several types with a sudden sense of their significance. Some of these, good and bad, are common to all late civilisations, he perceives, others as hatefully peculiar to our own as certain diseases. Where, in God's name, were there ever till now men like these, who bend a complaisant spectacled gaze on a world going under, content if they may but first secure their museum sample (including one carefully chosen, perfectly embalmed, stuffed and catalogued peasant) of every species? Or their younger kindred—men whose intellect obeys no inspiration save curiosity nor law save its own limit, whose inventions, therefore, cannot foster good and beauty but only spoil these in Nature and men's souls? As for that splendid group beyond, one may question if Athens, Rome, or Byzantium, whose sumptuous culture of brain and body achieved an almost criminal comeliness by Christian standards, ever equalled them: question, too, whether their selfish perfection or the travesty of it in this mob of women dull with luxury, of men brutalised by the scramble of getting it for them—be less desirable for the race! Thankfully his eye passes from them to those who turn such a cold shoulder upon their vulgarity: a little company, fine-edged, polished and flexible with perpetual fence of wit and word, hardly peculiar to our day perhaps, but rather such as might have played their irresponsible game on the eve of any red revolution. Now and again they lend an amused ear to various gassy gospels over the way, where, as he perceives, he is once more among the children of this latter day alone: notably certain insignificances who, because they have raised their self-indulgence to the dignity of a problem play, are solemnly mistaking themselves (as actors and audience too) for pioneers of social progress; and some earnest women who have slammed the front door on their nearest and dearest stay-at-home duties and privileges, to go questing after problematical rights. It looks, too, as if the same types, modified for worse and better by class conditions, were repeated below the salt; but there the multitude is so great that the individuals are soon lost in a far-off colourless mass—sometimes a menacing mass—by no means so content with stale bread as the others with caviare.

To be continue in this ebook 

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.