Under Occupation: Resistance and Struggle in a Militarised Asia-Pacific

Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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This edited volume provides a vehicle for the expression of geographical and historical perspectives on the militarisation of East Asia and the Pacific. Among the questions the authors explore are: How have groups and individuals variously enforced, justified, supported, resisted, and acquiesced in military occupation? How have concepts of nationality, identity, and self-determination been shaped, reshaped, and erased by historical processes? How can communities escape from their perceived or actual dependence on centralised loci of power? Chapters draw upon philosophical, theoretical, empirical, and anecdotal evidence. The book is aimed at, inter alia, activists for social justice and researchers in international and strategic relations, colonial and post-colonial studies, Asian, Okinawan, and Pacific island studies, critical theory, and ethics.

Contributors to this volume include David Vine, Douglas Lummis, Miyume Tanji, Kyle Kajihiro, chinin usii, Leevin Camacho, Andrew Yeo, Mitzi Uehara Carter, Gwisook Gwon, Christopher Melley, Yukinori Tokuyama, Kiyomi Maedomari-Tokuyama, Nika Nashiro, Chie Miyagi, Makoto Arakaki, Peter Simpson, and Daniel Broudy.

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About the author

Daniel Broudy is Professor of Rhetoric and Applied Linguistics at Okinawa Christian University. He has taught in the United States, Korea, and Japan. His research includes the critical analysis of media discourse, signs, and symbols. He is co-author of Rhetorical Rape (2010), serves as a managing editor for Synaesthesia communications journal, and writes about current discourse practices that shape the public mind.

Peter Simpson is Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at Okinawa International University. He has taught in Britain, Africa, and Japan. His research includes media literacy and criticism, democracy, social justice, and human rights. Most recently, his activities have been directed toward independent media and direct action in opposition to American militarisation.

Makoto Arakaki is Associate Professor of Peace Studies at Okinawa Christian University. His research includes international political economy, Okinawan diaspora, and community organising. Most recently, he has been involved in the revitalisation efforts of Okinawan culture and language, NGO activities in Asia, and documentary photography.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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Published on
Jul 29, 2013
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Pages
305
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ISBN
9781443851237
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Colonialism & Post-Colonialism
Political Science / International Relations / General
Social Science / Regional Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Peter Simpson
This book is a meticulously researched but very readable story of Huguenot Paul Fourdriniers journey from being an apprentice in Holland to a highly recognized printmaker in London in the eighteenth century. Paul is almost forgotten and artistically underrated but was an accomplished copper engraver who founded the English Fourdrinier dynasty, which produced the developers of the Fourdrinier papermaking machine and the mother of Cardinal Newman. The reader will be immersed in his world and his connections to aristocrats, artists, and great projects of the ageincluding the development of Palladian neoclassical architecture, the Foundlings Hospital, and the Savannah colony in Georgiaand renowned talents such as the sculptor Rysbrack, painter Hogarth, designer William Kent, and composer George Frederick Handel. As well as the great and powerful, we meet the eccentricsGeorge Vertue, Horace Walpole, the reverend Stephen Duck, Batty Langley, courtesan Teresia Constantia Phillips, and the curious affair of Mary Toft, who convinced half the nation that she had given birth to rabbits. This was a time of exciting intellectual development. The combination of copper engraving and printing along with the removal of state censorship and the institution of copyright led to a wave of information and learning not dissimilar to the impact of the Internet. The institution of commercial companies and banks foreshadowed the Industrial Revolution and made possible projects such as Charles Labeyles first Westminster Bridge, the building of Regency Bath and James Gibbs Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, all engraved by Fourdrinier on behalf of their creators. In his shop in Whitehall, he developed master engravings of uncommon size and shapes for customers, including the Earls of Burlington and Pembroke, and engraved for Thomas Wright, the astronomer who first defined galaxies, and William Chambers, who propelled Chinese fashion into Georgian design. This is a fascinating book from beginning to end.
Nelson A Denis
In 1950, after over fifty years of military occupation and colonial rule, the Nationalist Party of Puerto Rico staged an unsuccessful armed insurrection against the United States. Violence swept through the island: assassins were sent to kill President Harry Truman, gunfights roared in eight towns, police stations and post offices were burned down. In order to suppress this uprising, the US Army deployed thousands of troops and bombarded two towns, marking the first time in history that the US government bombed its own citizens.

Nelson A. Denis tells this powerful story through the controversial life of Pedro Albizu Campos, who served as the president of the Nationalist Party. A lawyer, chemical engineer, and the first Puerto Rican to graduate from Harvard Law School, Albizu Campos was imprisoned for twenty-five years and died under mysterious circumstances. By tracing his life and death, Denis shows how the journey of Albizu Campos is part of a larger story of Puerto Rico and US colonialism.

Through oral histories, personal interviews, eyewitness accounts, congressional testimony, and recently declassified FBI files, War Against All Puerto Ricans tells the story of a forgotten revolution and its context in Puerto Rico's history, from the US invasion in 1898 to the modern-day struggle for self-determination. Denis provides an unflinching account of the gunfights, prison riots, political intrigue, FBI and CIA covert activity, and mass hysteria that accompanied this tumultuous period in Puerto Rican history.
Peter Simpson
‘Why was it then that out of the hundreds of towns and universities in the English-speaking lands scattered over the seven seas, only one should at that time act as a focus of creative literature of more than local significance; that it should be in Christchurch, New Zealand, that a group of young writers had appeared who were eager to assimilate the pioneer developments in style and technique that were being made in England and America since the beginning of the century...and to give their country a new conscience and spiritual perspective?’ – John Lehmann For two decades in Christchurch, New Zealand, a cast of extraordinary men and women remade the arts. Variously between 1933 and 1953, Christchurch was the home of Angus and Bensemann and McCahon, Curnow and Glover and Baxter, the Group, the Caxton Press and the Little Theatre, Landfall and Tomorrow, Ngaio Marsh and Douglas Lilburn. It was a city in which painters lived with writers, writers promoted musicians, in which the arts and artists from different forms were deeply intertwined. And it was a city where artists developed a powerful synthesis of European modernist influences and an assertive New Zealand nationalism that gave mid-century New Zealand cultural life its particular shape. In this book, Simpson tells the remarkable story of the rise and fall of this ‘Bloomsbury South’ and the arts and artists that made it. Simpson brings to life the individual talents and their passions, but he also takes us inside the scenes that they created together: Bethell and her visiting coterie of younger poets; Glover and Bensemann’s exacting typography at the Caxton Press; the yearly exhibitions and aesthetic clashes of the Group; McCahon and Baxter’s developing friendship; the effects of Brasch’s patronage; Marsh’s Shakespearian re-creations at the Little Theatre. Simpson recreates a Christchurch we have lost, where a group of artists collaborated to create a distinctively New Zealand art which spoke to the condition of their country as it emerged into the modern era.
Peter Simpson
Robert French
Miyume Tanji
Peter Simpson
‘Why was it then that out of the hundreds of towns and universities in the English-speaking lands scattered over the seven seas, only one should at that time act as a focus of creative literature of more than local significance; that it should be in Christchurch, New Zealand, that a group of young writers had appeared who were eager to assimilate the pioneer developments in style and technique that were being made in England and America since the beginning of the century...and to give their country a new conscience and spiritual perspective?’ – John Lehmann For two decades in Christchurch, New Zealand, a cast of extraordinary men and women remade the arts. Variously between 1933 and 1953, Christchurch was the home of Angus and Bensemann and McCahon, Curnow and Glover and Baxter, the Group, the Caxton Press and the Little Theatre, Landfall and Tomorrow, Ngaio Marsh and Douglas Lilburn. It was a city in which painters lived with writers, writers promoted musicians, in which the arts and artists from different forms were deeply intertwined. And it was a city where artists developed a powerful synthesis of European modernist influences and an assertive New Zealand nationalism that gave mid-century New Zealand cultural life its particular shape. In this book, Simpson tells the remarkable story of the rise and fall of this ‘Bloomsbury South’ and the arts and artists that made it. Simpson brings to life the individual talents and their passions, but he also takes us inside the scenes that they created together: Bethell and her visiting coterie of younger poets; Glover and Bensemann’s exacting typography at the Caxton Press; the yearly exhibitions and aesthetic clashes of the Group; McCahon and Baxter’s developing friendship; the effects of Brasch’s patronage; Marsh’s Shakespearian re-creations at the Little Theatre. Simpson recreates a Christchurch we have lost, where a group of artists collaborated to create a distinctively New Zealand art which spoke to the condition of their country as it emerged into the modern era.
Peter Simpson
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