Translation 101: Starting Out As A Translator

Petro Dudi
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This book is for anyone contemplating on becoming a translator, or for existing translators that need a concise crash course on their profession.

It explores the realm of translation, the benefits and working conditions, the types of translation work and tools available. It gets down to details regarding the tools a translator uses every day, providing information not only from the translator's perspective but also from the viewpoint of the translation engineer and translation project manager. It provides a hands-on approach to CAT (Computer-Assisted Translation) Tools, on how you can take advantage of them regardless of your CAT Tool of choice.

You'll also learn how to successfully run your freelance translation business. You'll be presented with "inside" information on how clients (especially translation agencies) choose their translators. You'll learn how to set up profiting rates and how to find promising clients. You'll be given ideas for efficient organization of your work process and tips for successful customer relationship management. And, you'll be shown how to stay away from fraudulent companies too.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Petro Dudi
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Published on
Sep 2, 2015
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Pages
135
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ISBN
9786050412154
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Translating & Interpreting
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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A New York Times Notable Book for 2011
One of The Economist's 2011 Books of the Year

People speak different languages, and always have. The Ancient Greeks took no notice of anything unless it was said in Greek; the Romans made everyone speak Latin; and in India, people learned their neighbors' languages—as did many ordinary Europeans in times past (Christopher Columbus knew Italian, Portuguese, and Castilian Spanish as well as the classical languages). But today, we all use translation to cope with the diversity of languages. Without translation there would be no world news, not much of a reading list in any subject at college, no repair manuals for cars or planes; we wouldn't even be able to put together flat-pack furniture.

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? ranges across the whole of human experience, from foreign films to philosophy, to show why translation is at the heart of what we do and who we are. Among many other things, David Bellos asks: What's the difference between translating unprepared natural speech and translating Madame Bovary? How do you translate a joke? What's the difference between a native tongue and a learned one? Can you translate between any pair of languages, or only between some? What really goes on when world leaders speak at the UN? Can machines ever replace human translators, and if not, why?

But the biggest question Bellos asks is this: How do we ever really know that we've understood what anybody else says—in our own language or in another? Surprising, witty, and written with great joie de vivre, this book is all about how we comprehend other people and shows us how, ultimately, translation is another name for the human condition.

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