Psychology in Practice: Health

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The 21st century is an increasingly health-conscious society. The psychology of healthcare is never far from the news, with constant media coverage of the medical profession, the NHS and healthy living. Psychology in Practice: Health looks at how psychological knowledge and methods can be applied to a wide range of issues of health and illness. This is essential reading for all those studying the theory and practice of health psychology and medicine.

Key learning aids include: a set of key terms for each chapter; practical exercises; section summaries and overall main chapter points; recommended further reading and web sites.

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About the author

Phil Banyard is a chief examiner and a best-selling author
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Additional Information

Publisher
Hodder Education
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Published on
Mar 1, 2002
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781444164169
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Educational Psychology
Psychology / Education & Training
Psychology / Industrial & Organizational Psychology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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How do we know right from wrong, good from bad, help from hindrance, and how can we judge the behavior of others?

Ethics are the rules and guidelines that we use to make such judgements. Often there are no clear answers, which make this subject both interesting and potentially frustrating. In this book the authors offer readers the opportunity to develop and express their own opinions in relation to ethics in psychology.

There are a number of famous many psychological studies that appear to have been harmful or cruel to the people or animals who took part in them. For example, memory researchers carried out studies on a man who had no memory for over forty years, but because he had no memory, he was never able to agree to the studies. Is this a reasonable thing to do to someone? Comparative psychologist Harry Harlow found that he could create severe and lasting distress in monkeys by keeping them in social isolation. Is this a reasonable thing to do even if we find out useful things about human distress?If you were able to use psychological techniques to break someone down so that they revealed information that was useful to your government would you do it? If so, why and if not, why not? These ethical issues are not easy to resolve and the debates continue as we encounter new dilemmas.

The book uses many examples of psychological research to look at

key ethical issues

ethical guidelines of psychologists

socially sensitive research

ethics in applied psychology

the use of animals in research

This book will be essential reading for and undergraduate and pre-undergraduate students studying psychology and students of other subjects concerned with ethics.

How do we know right from wrong, good from bad, help from hindrance, and how can we judge the behaviour of others?

Ethics are the rules and guidelines that we use to make such judgements. Often there are no clear answers, which make this subject both interesting and potentially frustrating. In this book, the authors offer readers the opportunity to develop and express their own opinions in relation to ethics in psychology.

There are many psychological studies that appear to have been harmful or cruel to the people or animals that took part in them. For example, memory researchers carried out studies on a man who had no memory for over forty years, but because he had no memory he was never able to agree to the studies. Is this a reasonable thing to do to someone? Comparative psychologist Harry Harlow found that he could create severe and lasting distress in monkeys by keeping them in social isolation. Is this a reasonable thing to do even if we find out useful things about human distress? If you were able to use psychological techniques to break someone down so that they revealed information that was useful to your government, would you do it? If so, why? If not, why not? These ethical issues are not easy to resolve and the debates continue as we encounter new dilemmas.

This book uses examples from psychological research to look at:

key ethical issues ethical guidelines of psychologists socially sensitive research ethics in applied psychology the use of animals in research

This book is essential reading for undergraduate and pre-undergraduate students of psychology and related subjects such as philosophy and social policy.

How do we know right from wrong, good from bad, help from hindrance, and how can we judge the behavior of others?

Ethics are the rules and guidelines that we use to make such judgements. Often there are no clear answers, which make this subject both interesting and potentially frustrating. In this book the authors offer readers the opportunity to develop and express their own opinions in relation to ethics in psychology.

There are a number of famous many psychological studies that appear to have been harmful or cruel to the people or animals who took part in them. For example, memory researchers carried out studies on a man who had no memory for over forty years, but because he had no memory, he was never able to agree to the studies. Is this a reasonable thing to do to someone? Comparative psychologist Harry Harlow found that he could create severe and lasting distress in monkeys by keeping them in social isolation. Is this a reasonable thing to do even if we find out useful things about human distress?If you were able to use psychological techniques to break someone down so that they revealed information that was useful to your government would you do it? If so, why and if not, why not? These ethical issues are not easy to resolve and the debates continue as we encounter new dilemmas.

The book uses many examples of psychological research to look at

key ethical issues

ethical guidelines of psychologists

socially sensitive research

ethics in applied psychology

the use of animals in research

This book will be essential reading for and undergraduate and pre-undergraduate students studying psychology and students of other subjects concerned with ethics.

How do we know right from wrong, good from bad, help from hindrance, and how can we judge the behaviour of others?

Ethics are the rules and guidelines that we use to make such judgements. Often there are no clear answers, which make this subject both interesting and potentially frustrating. In this book, the authors offer readers the opportunity to develop and express their own opinions in relation to ethics in psychology.

There are many psychological studies that appear to have been harmful or cruel to the people or animals that took part in them. For example, memory researchers carried out studies on a man who had no memory for over forty years, but because he had no memory he was never able to agree to the studies. Is this a reasonable thing to do to someone? Comparative psychologist Harry Harlow found that he could create severe and lasting distress in monkeys by keeping them in social isolation. Is this a reasonable thing to do even if we find out useful things about human distress? If you were able to use psychological techniques to break someone down so that they revealed information that was useful to your government, would you do it? If so, why? If not, why not? These ethical issues are not easy to resolve and the debates continue as we encounter new dilemmas.

This book uses examples from psychological research to look at:

key ethical issues ethical guidelines of psychologists socially sensitive research ethics in applied psychology the use of animals in research

This book is essential reading for undergraduate and pre-undergraduate students of psychology and related subjects such as philosophy and social policy.

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