Armies of the Greek-Turkish War 1919–22

Bloomsbury Publishing
1
Free sample

This is a comprehensive guide to the armies that fought a devastating and decisive conflict in the Eastern Mediterranean between the two World Wars of the 20th century. From the initial Greek invasion, designed to "liberate" the 100,000 ethnic Greeks that lived in Western Turkey and had done for centuries, to Mustafa Kemal Atatürk's incredibly efficient formation of a national government and a regular army, this was a war that shaped the geopolitical landscape of the Mediterranean to this day. It gave birth to the modern Turkish state, displacing millions and creating bitter memories of atrocities committed by both sides. Augmented with very rare photographs and beautiful illustrations, this ground-breaking title explores the history, organization, and appearance of the armies, both guerilla and conventional, that fought in this bloody war.
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About the author

Philip Jowett was born in Leeds in 1961, and has been interested in military history for as long as he can remember. His first Osprey book was the ground-breaking Men-at-Arms 306: Chinese Civil War Armies 1911–49; he has since published the three-part sequence The Italian Army 1940–45 (Men-at-Arms 340, 349 and 353).

Stephen Walsh studied Art at the North East Wales Institute and has worked as a professional illustrator since 1988. Since then he has illustrated a variety of books and games including Settlers of Catan. His projects for Osprey include such diverse subjects as the battle of Otterburn, the Chinese army from 1937 to 1949 and the US Home Front in World War II.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Jul 20, 2015
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Pages
48
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ISBN
9781472806864
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
History / Middle East / Turkey & Ottoman Empire
History / Military / General
History / Military / World War I
History / Modern / 20th Century
Technology & Engineering / Military Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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