Euripides' Revolution under Cover

Cornell Studies in Classical Philology

Book 65
Cornell University Press
Free sample

In this provocative book, Pietro Pucci explores what he sees as Euripides's revolutionary literary art. While scholars have long pointed to subversive elements in Euripides’s plays, Pucci goes a step further in identifying a Euripidean program of enlightened thought enacted through carefully wrought textual strategies. The driving force behind this program is Euripides’s desire to subvert the traditional anthropomorphic view of the Greek gods—a belief system that in his view strips human beings of their independence and ability to act wisely and justly. Instead of fatuous religious beliefs, Athenians need the wisdom and the strength to navigate the challenges and difficulties of life.Throughout his lifetime, Euripides found himself the target of intense criticism and ridicule. He was accused of promoting new ideas that were considered destructive. Like his contemporary, Socrates, he was considered a corrupting influence. No wonder, then, that Euripides had to carry out his revolution "under cover." Pucci lays out the various ways the playwright skillfully inserted his philosophical principles into the text through innovative strategies of plot development, language and composition, and production techniques that subverted the traditionally staged anthropomorphic gods.
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About the author

Pietro Pucci is Goldwin Smith Professor of Classics Emeritus at Cornell University. He is the author of several books, including Odysseus Polutropos: Intertexual Readings in the "Odyssey" and the "Iliad", The Violence of Pity in Euripides’ "Medea", and Oedipus and the Fabrication of the Father: "Oedipus Tyrannus" in Modern Criticism and Philosophy.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cornell University Press
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Published on
Mar 21, 2016
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Pages
246
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ISBN
9781501704048
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / Ancient & Classical
Philosophy / History & Surveys / Ancient & Classical
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This content is DRM protected.
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