Finance in Asia: Institutions, Regulation and Policy

Routledge
Free sample

Asia’s demand for second-generation financial institutions and markets needs to be met in order for the region’s further development to be sustained. This book provides a compelling, fact-based assessment of current practices and regulations in Asia’s financial institutions and markets and carefully documents the exciting opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in the region’s financial systems.

This book differs in design from typical treatments of financial institutions and markets because its focus is on Asia rather than using the US model (in terms of market configurations or products) as a benchmark, and its takes a contemporary and forward-looking view of financial markets.

Examples of practice from Asia are used to illustrate major accepted themes in finance and financial regulation. To the extent that Asia’s main economies share characteristics that are distinct, for example, in the relationship between government and the banking sector, or in aspects of corporate governance, the book will discuss the consequences for market operation and intermediation.

The book’s carefully structured facts and rigorously argued analysis carry important implications both for students in business and law and for professionals new to financial markets in Asia. It will change the way that Asian financial markets and institutions is taught in universities as well as provide a valuable resource for professionals working in finance in Asia.

Read more

About the author

Qiao Liu is Professor of Finance and Economics in the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University.

Paul Lejot is Visiting Fellow at the Asian Institute of International Financial Law at the University of Hong Kong.

Douglas W. Arner is Professor and Head of the Department of Law in the Faculty of Law of the University of Hong Kong.

Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
Read more
Published on
Mar 12, 2013
Read more
Pages
610
Read more
ISBN
9781135072971
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / International / Economics
Business & Economics / International / General
Political Science / World / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
This clearly written and engrossing book presents a global narrative of the origins of the modern world from 1400 to the present. Unlike most studies, which assume that the “rise of the West” is the story of the coming of the modern world, this history, drawing upon new scholarship on Asia, Africa, and the New World and upon the maturing field of environmental history, constructs a story in which those parts of the world play major roles, including their impacts on the environment. Robert B. Marks defines the modern world as one marked by industry, the nation state, interstate warfare, a large and growing gap between the wealthiest and poorest parts of the world, increasing inequality within the wealthiest industrialized countries, and an escape from the environmental constraints of the “biological old regime.” He explains its origins by emphasizing contingencies (such as the conquest of the New World); the broad comparability of the most advanced regions in China, India, and Europe; the reasons why England was able to escape from common ecological constraints facing all of those regions by the eighteenth century; a conjuncture of human and natural forces that solidified a gap between the industrialized and non-industrialized parts of the world; and the mounting environmental crisis that defines the modern world.

Now in a new edition that brings the saga of the modern world to the present in an environmental context, the book considers how and why the United States emerged as a world power in the twentieth century and became the sole superpower by the twenty-first century, and why the changed relationship of humans to the environmental likely will be the hallmark of the modern era—the “Anthopocene.” Once again arguing that the U.S. rise to global hegemon was contingent, not inevitable, Marks also points to the resurgence of Asia and the vastly changed relationship of humans to the environment that may in the long run overshadow any political and economic milestones of the past hundred years.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.