From Summits to Solutions: Innovations in Implementing the Sustainable Development Goals

Brookings Institution Press
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A positive agenda for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030

All 193 member nations of the United Nations agreed in September 2015 to adopt a set of seventeen "Sustainable Development Goals," to be achieved by 2030. Each of the goals—in such areas as education and health car —is laudable in and of itself, and governments and organizations are working hard on them. But so far there is no overall, positive agenda of what new things need to be done to ensure the goals are achieved across all nations.

In a search of fresh approaches to the longstanding problems targeted by the Sustainable Development Goals, the Japan International Cooperation Agency and the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings mounted a collaborative research effort to advance implementation of Agenda 2030. This edited volume is the product of that effort.

The book approaches the UN's goals through three broad lenses.

The first considers new approaches to capturing value. Examples include Nigeria's first green bonds, practical methods to expand women's economic opportunities, benchmarking to reflect business contributions to achieving the goals, new incentives for investment in infrastructure, and educational systems that promote cross-sector problem solving.

The second lens entails new approaches to targeting places, including oceans, rural areas, fast-growing developing cities, and the interlocking challenge of data systems, including geospatial information generated by satellites.

The third lens focuses on updating governance, broadly defined. Issues include how civil society can align with the SDG challenge; how an advanced economy like Canada can approach the goals at home and abroad; what needs to be done to foster new approaches for managing the global commons; and how can multilateral institutions for health and development finance evolve.

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About the author

Raj Desai is a visiting fellow in Global Economy and Development at Brookings Institution, and associate professor of international development in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Previously, he was a member of the core team for the World Bank's World Development Report unit.

Hiroshi Kato is senior vice president of the Japan International Cooperation Agency, overseeing several departments (Africa, Infrastructure and Peacebuilding, Rural Development, Domestic Strategy and Partnership) and JICA-University Alliance for Development Studies. Previously, he served as director of the JICA Research Institute.

Homi Kharas is the interim vice president and director of Global Economy and Development at Brookings Institution. He has served as the lead author and executive secretary of the secretariat supporting the High Level Panel advising the U.N. secretary general on the post-2015 development agenda (2012–13).

John W. McArthur is a senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings Institution. He is also a senior adviser to the UN Foundation and a board governor for the International Development Research Centre. Previously, he served as chief executive officer of Millennium Promise and manager of the UN Millennium Project.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Jul 24, 2018
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Pages
402
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ISBN
9780815736646
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / Economic Development
Business & Economics / Development / Sustainable Development
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Prior to the 2016 Sustainable Development Goals, the United Nations (UN) had eight "global goals" set out to all 191 UN member states at that time, and at least 22 international organizations. Seven out of the eight United National Millennium Development Goals are social goals. The attainment of such goals would require a substantial proportion of public sector expenditure. Without a robust rate of economic growth, whatever is achieved cannot be sustainable. Developmental State and Millennium Development Goals argues that this is the main reason why some of the largest developing countries fell short in achieving the goals. Contents: Realising Millennium Development Goals: A Case of Making the State Look Globally Powerful (Kartik Roy)The Interventionist State in the Attainment of Developmental Goals (Kartik Roy and Yogesh Vansiya)From Quasi-educated Unskilled Labour to Skill Endowed Human Capital: A Firm Level Experience in India (Sandip Kar)Eradication of Extreme Poverty: A Regional Experience in Provincial India (Hemali Desai)Gender-based Inequality in India: An Inter-state Analysis (Sarita Agrawal)Trade Governance in Emerging States Under Global Trade Partnership (Kartik Roy)Trade for Economic Development in Sub-Saharan (Eastern) Africa: A Critical Commentary (Katarzyna Ann Nawrot)Improving Competitiveness and Economic Development Through FDI (Ivana Domazet)Tourism in the Realisation of India's Developmental Goals (Gaurang Dattubhai Rami)From Stockholm Declaration to Millennium Development Goals: The United Nation's Journey to Environmental Sustainability (Choy Yee Keong)Between Development and Sustainability: Adaptation Strategies for China and Indonesia (James Ferguson and Rosita Dellios)Geopolitics of Development: Opportunities for China and India (Rosita Dellios and James Ferguson)Shadow Economy and Corruption: India, China and Brazil (Kartik Roy)Effort to Realise Developmental Goals: Lessons Learnt (Kartik Roy)
Readership: Advance undergraduates taking developmental economics modules and researchers considering the sustainability of the SGDs and MDGs.
Keywords: MDG;SDG;Millenium Developmental Goals;Sustainable Development Goals;United Nations;UN;Developmental EconomicsReview:0
Sustainable development is the central challenge of the 21st Century. How can human civilization continue to develop without destroying the natural systems on which it depends?Environmentalists tell us that capitalism is the problem because it feeds our self-interest. They tell us that we have to restrain ourselves and only consume what the Earth can sustain. Or governments must tell us what we can and cannot buy. This book uses the science of complex systems to explain why governments cannot deliver sustainability or happiness and how self-interest can be used to make society sustainable.

Capitalism won the Cold War; until the Great Recession of 2008, it seemed to be the perfect system. But more of us are unhappy even as it has ravaged the planet. The central problem is the paradigm on which our social systems are founded that more (consumption, production, possessions) is always better. Based on research from political economy, philosophy, and psychology, this book shows that the problem is not self-interest. We are unhappy because we have been taught that our interests are material and that buying 'stuff' will make us happy. Yet, social pressure to consume only prevents us from satisfying our basic psychological needs and fully enjoying life. For that we need to pursue our personal well-being. Because this also reduces our material consumption, environmental sustainability comes from each of us knowing what's truly good for our selves. Even without the constant economic growth that harms the planet and damages our lives, capitalism also is sustainable. This book will be of interest to scholars and students of sustainability;civil societyactivists and social entrepreneurs; thought leaders and policymakers.

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Viewed from a global scale, steady progress has been made in reducing extreme poverty—defined by the $1.25-a-day poverty line—over the past three decades. This success has sparked renewed enthusiasm about the possibility of eradicating extreme poverty within a generation. However, progress is expected to become more difficult, and slower, over time. This book will examine three central changes that need to be overcome in traveling the last mile: breaking cycles of conflict, supporting inclusive growth, and managing shocks and risks. By uncovering new evidence and identifying new ideas and solutions for spurring peace, jobs, and resilience in poor countries, The Last Mile in Ending Extreme Poverty will outline an agenda to inform poverty reduction strategies for governments, donors, charities, and foundations around the world.

Contents

Part I: Peace: Breaking the Cycle of Conflict

External finance for state and peace building, Marcus Manuel and Alistair McKechnie, Overseas Development Institute

Reforming international cooperation to improve the sustainability of peace, Bruce Jones, Brookings and New York University

Bridging state and local communities through livelihood improvements, Ryutaro Murotani, JICA, and Yoichi Mine, JICA-RI and Doshisha University

Postconflict trajectories and the potential for poverty reduction, Gary Milante, SIPRI

Part II: Jobs: Supporting Inclusive Growth

Structural change and Africa's poverty puzzle, John Page, Brookings

Public goods for private jobs: lessons from the Pacific, Shane Evans, Michael Carnahan and Alice Steele, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Government of Australia

Strategies for inclusive development in agrarian Sub-Saharan countries, Akio Hosono, JICA-RI

The role of agriculture in poverty reduction, John McArthur, Brookings, UN Foundation, and Fung Global Institute

Part III: Resilience: Managing Shocks and Risks

Environmental stress and conflict, Stephen Smith, George Washington University and Brookings

Toward community resilience: The role of social capital after disasters, Go Shimada, JICA-RI

Social protection and the end of extreme poverty, Raj Desai, Georgetown University and Brookings

Some 600 million children worldwide do not legally exist. Without verifiable identification, they—and unregistered adults—could face serious difficulties in proving their identity, whether to open a bank account, purchase a SIM card, or cast a vote. Lack of identification is a barrier to full economic and social inclusion.

Recent advances in the reach and technological sophistication of identification systems have been nothing less than revolutionary. Since 2000, over 60 developing countries have established national ID programs. Digital technology, particularly biometrics such as fingerprints and iris scans, has dramatically expanded the capabilities of these programs. Individuals can now be uniquely identified and reliably authenticated against their claimed identities. By enabling governments to work more effectively and transparently, identification is becoming a tool for accelerating development progress. Not only is provision of legal identity for all a target under the Sustainable Development Goals, but this book shows how it is also central to achieving numerous other SDG targets.

Yet, challenges remain. Identification systems can fail to include the poor, leaving them still unable to exercise their rights, access essential services, or fully participate in political and economic life. The possible erosion of privacy and the misuse of personal data, especially in countries that lack data privacy laws or the capacity to enforce them, is another challenge. Yet another is ensuring that investments in identification systems deliver a development payoff. There are all too many examples where large expenditures—sometimes supported by donor governments or agencies—appear to have had little impact.

Identification Revolution: Can Digital ID be Harnessed for Development? offers a balanced perspective on this new area, covering both the benefits and the risks of the identification revolution, as well as pinpointing opportunities to mitigate those risks.

How the United States helped restore a Europe battered by World War II and created the foundation for the postwar international order

Seventy years ago, in the wake of World War II, the United States did something almost unprecedented in world history: It launched and paid for an economic aid plan to restore a continent reeling from war. The European Recovery Plan—better known as the Marshall Plan, after chief advocate Secretary of State George C. Marshall—was in part an act of charity but primarily an act of self-interest, intended to prevent postwar Western Europe from succumbing to communism. By speeding the recovery of Europe and establishing the basis for NATO and diplomatic alliances that endure to this day, it became one of the most successful U.S. government programs ever.

The Brookings Institution played an important role in the adoption of the Marshall Plan. At the request of Arthur Vandenberg, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Brookings scholars analyzed the plan, including the specifics of how it could be implemented. Their report gave Vandenberg the information he needed to shepherd the plan through a Republican-dominated Congress in a presidential election year.

In his foreword to this book, Brookings president Strobe Talbott reviews the global context in which the Truman administration pushed the Marshall Plan through Congress, as well as Brookings' role in that process. The book includes Marshall's landmark speech at Harvard University in June 1947 laying out the rationale for the European aid program, the full text of the report from Brookings analyzing the plan, and the lecture Marshall gave upon receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1953. The book concludes with an essay by Bruce Jones and Will Moreland that demonstrates how the Marshall Plan helped shape the entire postwar era and how today's leaders can learn from the plan's challenges and successes.

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