Civil Society, Public Sphere and Citizenship: Dialogues and Perceptions

SAGE Publications India
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What is the political role of the Indian citizen today? What are his/her options, commitments and requirements within Indian civil society and its public sphere? What difference does it make if a person makes use of his/her democratic citizenship in a more active or passive way? Who is allowed to participate actively and who is denied access to democratic rights? What impact does civil society have on the Indian state today? Is there a predominant culture, and in which way does this predominance affect its responsibilities?

While these questions have long been discussed both within India and abroad, the contributors to this volume seek to provide new points of view and enrich the ongoing debate.

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About the author

Rajeev Bhargava was Professor of political theory and Indian political thought and the Head of the Department of Political Science at the University of Delhi, and is a prominent scholar of multi-culturalism and secularism in nonwestern societies. He has held fellowships in the Harvard University Program in Ethics and the Professions at the British Academy. Professor Bhargava is the Editor of Secularism and its Critics (1998) and Civil Society, Public Sphere and Citizenship: Dialogues and Perceptions (2005), and co-editor of Multiculturalism, Liberalism and Democracy (1990) and Transforming India (2000). He is the author of Individualism in Social Science (1992). At present, he is the Director of Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi, India.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications India
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Published on
May 11, 2005
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Pages
420
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ISBN
9788132103967
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Civics & Citizenship
Political Science / Civil Rights
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Democracy
Political Science / World / Asian
Social Science / Sociology / General
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This book looks at concepts of justice from points of view of various religious and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Cosmopolitanism, Tribal Cultures) and different methodological perspectives (historical, theological, philosophical, sociological). One common thread in these essays is the reflection on ethics universally and reference to the basic values of the Indian constitution. People from all categories were included in the dialogue process on justice in order to avoid any risk of unintentionally missing out people belonging to certain categories.

This volume attempts to express the opinions of people whose voices were not very prominent in theoretical debates on justice and its practical implications. Their perspectives on justice are contrasted with mainstream conceptions of justice, whose problematic representativeness for India today is thereby interpreted. Both abstract universalism and relativism lack a common point of reference to assess relevance and adequacy of a given conception of justice. Neither unaffected universalism nor relativism defined by traditional norms turns is sustainable. The contributors offer a concept of 'internal universalism' as an alternative to unaffected universalism.

Combining various forms and stages of 'reflective equilibrium' as conceived by John Rawls, this framework provides us with the necessary reference point to assess the adequacy as proposed in this book and engage in a comprehensive dialogue on questions of justice.

This book looks at concepts of justice from points of view of various religious and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Cosmopolitanism, Tribal Cultures) and different methodological perspectives (historical, theological, philosophical, sociological). One common thread in these essays is the reflection on ethics universally and reference to the basic values of the Indian constitution. People from all categories were included in the dialogue process on justice in order to avoid any risk of unintentionally missing out people belonging to certain categories.

This volume attempts to express the opinions of people whose voices were not very prominent in theoretical debates on justice and its practical implications. Their perspectives on justice are contrasted with mainstream conceptions of justice, whose problematic representativeness for India today is thereby interpreted. Both abstract universalism and relativism lack a common point of reference to assess relevance and adequacy of a given conception of justice. Neither unaffected universalism nor relativism defined by traditional norms turns is sustainable. The contributors offer a concept of 'internal universalism' as an alternative to unaffected universalism.

Combining various forms and stages of 'reflective equilibrium' as conceived by John Rawls, this framework provides us with the necessary reference point to assess the adequacy as proposed in this book and engage in a comprehensive dialogue on questions of justice.

This book looks at concepts of justice from points of view of various religious and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Cosmopolitanism, Tribal Cultures) and different methodological perspectives (historical, theological, philosophical, sociological). One common thread in these essays is the reflection on ethics universally and reference to the basic values of the Indian constitution. People from all categories were included in the dialogue process on justice in order to avoid any risk of unintentionally missing out people belonging to certain categories.

This volume attempts to express the opinions of people whose voices were not very prominent in theoretical debates on justice and its practical implications. Their perspectives on justice are contrasted with mainstream conceptions of justice, whose problematic representativeness for India today is thereby interpreted. Both abstract universalism and relativism lack a common point of reference to assess relevance and adequacy of a given conception of justice. Neither unaffected universalism nor relativism defined by traditional norms turns is sustainable. The contributors offer a concept of 'internal universalism' as an alternative to unaffected universalism.

Combining various forms and stages of 'reflective equilibrium' as conceived by John Rawls, this framework provides us with the necessary reference point to assess the adequacy as proposed in this book and engage in a comprehensive dialogue on questions of justice.

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