Grinding It Out: The Making of McDonald's

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"He either enchants or antagonizes everyone he meets. But even his enemies agree there are three things Ray Kroc does damned well: sell hamburgers, make money, and tell stories." --from Grinding It Out

Few entrepreneurs can claim to have radically changed the way we live, and Ray Kroc is one of them. His revolutions in food-service automation, franchising, shared national training, and advertising have earned him a place beside the men and women who have founded not only businesses, but entire empires. But even more interesting than Ray Kroc the business man is Ray Kroc the man. Not your typical self-made tycoon, Kroc was fifty-two years old when he opened his first franchise. In Grinding It Out, you'll meet the man behind McDonald's, one of the largest fast-food corporations in the world with over 32,000 stores around the globe.

Irrepressible enthusiast, intuitive people person, and born storyteller, Kroc will fascinate and inspire you on every page.

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About the author

Ray Kroc was an American businessman most famous for founding McDonald's at the age of fifty-two. Widely regarded as one of the most successful entrepreneurs of the twentieth century, Kroc was unfailingly motivated, and continued to evolve and adapt his business practices up until his death to make McDonald's the worldwide phenomenon it is today. He died in California in 1984.
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Additional Information

Publisher
St. Martin's Griffin
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Published on
Aug 2, 2016
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781250127518
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Business
Business & Economics / Corporate & Business History
Business & Economics / Industries / Food Industry
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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