A Vietnam Trilogy, Vol. I: Veterans and Post Traumatic Stress, 1968, 1989, 2000

Algora Publishing
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In this study of the psychiatric impact of war on soldiers and veterans, Scurfield (social work, U. of Southern Mississippi) recounts his three different experiences in Vietnam, first, in 1968, as an Army social work officer working with psychiatric casualties, and in 1989 and 2000 when he and other veterans returned on missions of peace. Scurfield
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Publisher
Algora Publishing
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Published on
Dec 31, 2004
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9780875863221
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Veterans
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Raymond M. Scurfield
War Trauma draws on the experience of prior wars for valuable insights to help people who are now in the military or in the healing professions, and their families and communities, to deal with todays realities of combat and its aftermath — which so often entails PTSD (post-traumatic stresss syndrome), depression and the risk of suicide. This is part three in A Vietnam Trilogy, which studies the psychiatric impact of war on soldiers and veterans, and their families. The effects go on for decades after the violence occurred, and we are still just learning to understand the depth and variety of problems it can cause. Further, Scurfield documents his proven innovative therapies for treating PTSD. This third volume looks at what military and mental health professionals — and the Veterans Administration (VA) — should have learned from the Vietnam War in order to better protect American servicemen and servicewomen in later conflicts and to help them recover afterwards. The Persian Gulf War, for instance, had an immense impact on veterans of all wars. The author was a national faculty member for joint VA-DOD training programs to enhance mental health response readiness for receiving anticipated medical and psychiatric casualties from the Persian Gulf War. What he found was a resurgence of selective amnesia and denial about the true impact of war. Scurfield notes, "Chillingly, what happened in Vietnam in 1968–69 regarding psychiatric casualties has enormous parallels to what is happening today regarding U.S. psychiatric casualties from the Iraq War."
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Raymond M. Scurfield
A Vietnam Trilogy reveals the psychiatric impact of war on soldiers and veterans, denied or minimized by government and the military. The effects go on for decades, and we are still just learning to understand them. Through efforts to treat veterans of past conflicts Raymond Scurfield, a nationally-renowned authority on post-traumatic stress disorder, illustrates the inevitability of lifelong psychiatric, psychological and social scars from today's conflicts as well. In War Trauma, the third volume in A Vietnam Trilogy, he looks at what military and mental health professionals should have learned from the Vietnam War and prior wars for insights to help people who are now in the military or in the healing professions, and their families and communities, to deal with today's realities of combat and its aftermath. The author was a national faculty member for joint VA-DOD training programs to enhance mental health response readiness in preparation for the Persian Gulf War. What he found was a resurgence of selective amnesia and denial about the true impact of war. Scurfield notes, "Chillingly, what happened in Vietnam in 1968-69 regarding psychiatric casualties has enormous parallels to what is happening today regarding US psychiatric casualties from the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars." A Vietnam Trilogy offers veterans, their families, their communities and their care providers insights into the nature of the traumas suffered and recommendations for therapy break-throughs for active duty military personnel and veterans with post-traumatic stress, and essential guidance for their families. Scurfield documents his innovative therapies for treating war trauma and PTSD and a comprehensive model yetto be attained in most treatment approaches; they will be the foundation for programs to help today's veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars and their families, in addition to veterans of previous wars still suffering from war trauma. * Raymond Monsour Scurfield, DSW, LCSW, ACSW, is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast. A Vietnam veteran, he worked for the Dept. of Veterans Affairs for 25 years and directed PTSD mental health programs in Los Angeles, Washington DC, the Pacific Northwest, Hawaii and American Samoa. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise in war-related PTSD through his leadership of innovative treatment programs, 50+ publications, 250+ presentations, educational videos, national media appearances and research. His most recent publications are on the continuing psychological impact of the events of 9/ll and Hurricane Katrina. Scurfield has received several outstanding university teacher awards, and the 2006 Mississippi Social Worker of the Year Award in recognition of his post-Hurricane Katrina social work activities and post-traumatic stress interventions on the MS Gulf Coast since August 29, 2005. Presenting Scurfield with the Deptartment of Veterans Affairs Olin Teague award in 1988, President Ronald Reagan said, "Your achievements in the study and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder have become landmarks in psychiatry." Scurfield continues to break new ground in the treatment of war-related PTSD.
Raymond M. Scurfield
A Vietnam Trilogy studies the psychiatric impact of war on soldiers and veterans, both during and in the decades after the violence, and recommends proven innovative therapies for treating PTSD. Through the wrenching stories of veterans and the author's own understanding as a mental health professional, Scurfield describes his and his comrades' experiences during the war; then he describes the healing process fostered by innovative return trips he has led to peace-time Vietnam in 1989 and, in conjunction with a university history program, in 2000, described in this volume. A Vietnam Trilogy offers veterans and their families a vicarious "healing journey" by relating the experiences of those who participated in these therapeutic efforts, and offers recommendations to veterans and those who wish to help them. The therapy breakthroughs for veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are now the model for innovative programs across America; and they will be the foundation for programs to help today's veterans of the Iraq War. * Raymond Monsour Scurfield, DSW, LCSW, ACSW, is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast. A Vietnam veteran, he worked for the Dept. of Veterans Affairs for 25 years and directed PTSD mental health programs in Los Angeles, Washington DC, the Pacific Northwest, Hawaii and American Samoa. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise in war-related PTSD through his leadership of innovative treatment programs, 50+ publications, 250+ presentations, educational videos, national media appearances and research. His most recent publications are on racism and PTSD, and the continuingpsychological impact of the events of 9/11. Scurfield co-led an award-winning study-abroad course taking three combat veterans and 16 history students to Vietnam in 2000, in a program that uniquely combined history and mental health curriculum and experiential learning. This, the second volume in A Vietnam Trilogy, details that project and includes a compelling formulation of what remains to be done concerning healing from the war - indeed, any war - and how to accomplish it. Scurfield has received several outstanding university teacher awards and he was awarded the Department of Veterans Affairs Olin E. Teague award for extraordinary contributions benefiting war-injured veterans. He received the 2006 Mississippi Social Worker of the Year Award by the Mississippi Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers in recognition of his post-Hurricane Katrina social work activities and post-traumatic stress interventions on the MS Gulf Coast since August 29, 2005. His achievements in the study and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder have become landmarks in psychiatry. "Dr. Scurfield's Vietnam Trilogy is a tremendous service to those of us in uniform who have served, as well as those charged with providing for the psychological well-being of our combat veterans, their families, mental health professionals, and the general public." -Kathy Platoni, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist, LTC/MS/USAR
Raymond M. Scurfield
A Vietnam Trilogy studies the psychiatric impact of war on soldiers and veterans, both during and in the decades after the violence, and recommends proven innovative therapies for treating PTSD. Through the wrenching stories of veterans and the author's own understanding as a mental health professional, Scurfield describes his and his comrades' experiences during the war; then he describes the healing process fostered by innovative return trips he has led to peace-time Vietnam in 1989 and, in conjunction with a university history program, in 2000, described in this volume. A Vietnam Trilogy offers veterans and their families a vicarious "healing journey" by relating the experiences of those who participated in these therapeutic efforts, and offers recommendations to veterans and those who wish to help them. The therapy breakthroughs for veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are now the model for innovative programs across America; and they will be the foundation for programs to help today's veterans of the Iraq War. * Raymond Monsour Scurfield, DSW, LCSW, ACSW, is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast. A Vietnam veteran, he worked for the Dept. of Veterans Affairs for 25 years and directed PTSD mental health programs in Los Angeles, Washington DC, the Pacific Northwest, Hawaii and American Samoa. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise in war-related PTSD through his leadership of innovative treatment programs, 50+ publications, 250+ presentations, educational videos, national media appearances and research. His most recent publications are on racism and PTSD, and the continuingpsychological impact of the events of 9/11. Scurfield co-led an award-winning study-abroad course taking three combat veterans and 16 history students to Vietnam in 2000, in a program that uniquely combined history and mental health curriculum and experiential learning. This, the second volume in A Vietnam Trilogy, details that project and includes a compelling formulation of what remains to be done concerning healing from the war - indeed, any war - and how to accomplish it. Scurfield has received several outstanding university teacher awards and he was awarded the Department of Veterans Affairs Olin E. Teague award for extraordinary contributions benefiting war-injured veterans. He received the 2006 Mississippi Social Worker of the Year Award by the Mississippi Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers in recognition of his post-Hurricane Katrina social work activities and post-traumatic stress interventions on the MS Gulf Coast since August 29, 2005. His achievements in the study and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder have become landmarks in psychiatry. "Dr. Scurfield's Vietnam Trilogy is a tremendous service to those of us in uniform who have served, as well as those charged with providing for the psychological well-being of our combat veterans, their families, mental health professionals, and the general public." -Kathy Platoni, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist, LTC/MS/USAR
Raymond M. Scurfield
War Trauma draws on the experience of prior wars for valuable insights to help people who are now in the military or in the healing professions, and their families and communities, to deal with todays realities of combat and its aftermath — which so often entails PTSD (post-traumatic stresss syndrome), depression and the risk of suicide. This is part three in A Vietnam Trilogy, which studies the psychiatric impact of war on soldiers and veterans, and their families. The effects go on for decades after the violence occurred, and we are still just learning to understand the depth and variety of problems it can cause. Further, Scurfield documents his proven innovative therapies for treating PTSD. This third volume looks at what military and mental health professionals — and the Veterans Administration (VA) — should have learned from the Vietnam War in order to better protect American servicemen and servicewomen in later conflicts and to help them recover afterwards. The Persian Gulf War, for instance, had an immense impact on veterans of all wars. The author was a national faculty member for joint VA-DOD training programs to enhance mental health response readiness for receiving anticipated medical and psychiatric casualties from the Persian Gulf War. What he found was a resurgence of selective amnesia and denial about the true impact of war. Scurfield notes, "Chillingly, what happened in Vietnam in 1968–69 regarding psychiatric casualties has enormous parallels to what is happening today regarding U.S. psychiatric casualties from the Iraq War."
Raymond M. Scurfield
A Vietnam Trilogy is about a side of war that for decades pro-military and pro-defense advocates have systematically suppressed, minimized and denigrated as being falsely exaggerated the indelible human cost of war on its participants that can and does persist for decades. The 3.14 million Vietnam war-zone veterans and 800,000 Vietnam-theater veterans suffering full or partial post-traumatic stress syndrome, and their families will find it invaluable. Volume Two, Healing Journeys, focuses on three Vietnam Vets making a return trip accompanying 16 students on a Study Abroad history course. Especially in the post 9/11, post-Iraq world, this trilogy is important reading for academics and mental health professionals including graduate and undergrad students in history, psychology, social work and religion, and professionals in psychiatry, clinical nursing, counseling, and religion, and academic specialists interested in study abroad programs. Through the wrenching stories of veterans and the authors own understanding as a mental health professional, Scurfield describes his and his comrades experiences during the war; then he describes the healing process fostered by innovative return trips he has led to peace-time Vietnam in 1989 and, in conjunction with a university history program, in 2000, described in this volume. A Vietnam Trilogy offers veterans and their families a vicarious "healing journey" by relating the experiences of those who participated in these therapeutic efforts, and offers recommendations to veterans and those who wish to help them. The therapy breakthroughs for veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are now the model for innovative programs across America; and they will be the foundation for programs to help today's veterans of the Iraq War.
Raymond M. Scurfield
The large numbers of psychiatric casualties from war used to be attributed to an underlying psychiatric disorder presenting the classic blame-the-victim scenario. When they were finally classified as what is now known as PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), the path was opened for more realistic and fruitful healing techniques. A Vietnam Trilogy, a three-volume work, describes a care-givers and numerous veterans perspectives of what happens to combatants during war, the therapeutic processes fostered by an innovative Department of Veteran Affairs treatment program directed by Dr. Scurfield, and the pioneering return trips he co-led to peace-time Vietnam in 1989 and 2000. Volume One relates the experiences of veterans and care-givers who participated in these therapeutic efforts, offering others an opportunity to gain a sense of what is entailed. For families, care-givers, students and teachers of history, and others, the book provides a glimpse from the participants view of the shock, the horrors, the overwhelming stress and the mindset that were so damaging to personnel in the war zone, as well as of the extraordinary courage and strength necessary to survive. Finally, it offers insight into creative therapeutic approaches and recommendations for veterans and those who wish to help them recover from the traumas of war. Through the wrenching stories of numerous veterans and the authors own understanding as a mental health professional who served in Vietnam, A Vietnam Trilogy reflects Scurfields three-fold experiences. He describes his and his comrades experiences in 1968, when he served as an Army social work officer attempting to help acute battlefield psychiatric casualties; Scurfield describes the healing process fostered by an innovative Department of Veteran Affairs treatment program and precedent-setting return trips he led to peace-time Vietnam in 1989 and 2000. A Vietnam Trilogy offers Vietnam veterans and other veterans a chance to share in the healing by relating the experiences of those who participated in these therapeutic efforts, and it offers recommendations to veterans and those who wish to help them. These therapy breakthroughs for veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are now the model for innovative programs across America; and they will be the foundation for programs to help todays veterans of the Iraq War. A Vietnam Trilogy is about a side of war that for decades pro-military and pro-defense advocates have systematically suppressed, minimized and denigrated as being falsely exaggerated the indelible and profound human cost of war on its participants that can and does persist for decades. The 3.14 million Vietnam war-zone veterans and 800,000 Vietnam-theater veterans suffering full or partial post-traumatic stress syndrome, and their families will find it invaluable. Especially in the post 9/11, post-Iraq world, this trilogy is important reading for academics and mental health professionals including graduate and under-grad students in history, psychology, social work and religion, and professionals in psychiatry, clinical nursing, counseling, and religion, and academic specialists interested in study-abroad programs.
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