The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

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Now an HBO® Film starring Oprah Winfrey and Rose Byrne


Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.
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Broadway Books
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Published on
Feb 2, 2010
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Biography & Autobiography / Science & Technology
Science / Life Sciences / Biology
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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#1 National Bestseller

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