At Balthazar: The New York Brasserie at the Center of the World

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Explore New York restaurant Balthazar and everything that makes it iconic in this brilliantly revealing book that celebrates the brasserie’s twentieth anniversary. Keith McNally, star restauranteur, gave author Reggie Nadelson unprecedented access to his legendary Soho brasserie, its staff, the archives, and the kitchens. Journalist Nadelson, who has covered restaurants and food for decades on both sides of the Atlantic, recounts the history of the French brasserie and how Keith McNally reinvented the concept for New York City.

At Balthazar is an irresistible, mouthwatering narrative, driven by the drama of a restaurant that serves half a million meals a year, employs over two hundred people, and has operated on a twenty-four hour cycle for twenty years. Upstairs and down, good times and bad, Nadelson explores the intricacies of the restaurant’s every aspect, interviewing the chef, waiters, bartenders, dishwashers—the human element of the beautifully oiled machine.

With evocative color photographs by Peter Nelson, sixteen new recipes from Balthazar Executive Chef Shane McBride and head bakers Paula Oland and Mark Tasker, At Balthazar voluptuously celebrates an amazing institution.
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About the author

Reggie Nadelson lives in New York and has written for Travel & Leisure, Vogue, and Conde Nast Traveller. She has had columns at The Guardian, The Financial Times, and Departures, where she wrote a series about cooking with the great chefs, such as Heston Blumenthal and Ruthie Rogers. Her Departures piece about fish in Hawaii was a finalist for the MFK Fisher Prize at the James Beard Awards. Her series of mysteries have been published in a dozen countries, and her nonfiction book, Comrade Rockstar was made into a documentary by the BBC and bought by Tom Hanks for a feature film. Find out more from ReggieNadelson.com.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Apr 4, 2017
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9781501116797
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Culinary
Cooking / Essays & Narratives
Cooking / Individual Chefs & Restaurants
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Hailed by Anthony Bourdain as “heartbreaking, horrifying, poignant, and inspiring,” 32 Yolks is the brave and affecting coming-of-age story about the making of a French chef, from the culinary icon behind the renowned New York City restaurant Le Bernardin.

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