Total Alignment: Tools and Tactics for Streamlining Your Organization

Entrepreneur Press
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ALIGN YOUR BUSINESS FOR SUCCESS

From overarching vision to individual competency scorecards, Total Alignment arms you with powerful concepts and tools to run a successful, efficient business. No matter what size or type of business you run, business strategy experts Riaz Khadem and Linda Khadem show you how to align your team and operations from the ground up and from the top down.

Total Alignment is the result of innovative thinking, solid research, and thirty successful years of consulting experience with major companies. Whether your team struggles most with communication, accountability, or motivation, this book will help you inspire your organization to produce efficiently, engage in the company's vision, and hold each other accountable for solid, sustained progress. Implement these concepts and tools to gain coherence, strength, and value:

• Measure and narrow alignment gaps in key areas of your business using the Alignment Survey
• Plan for your company’s growth and measure it along the way with the Alignment Map
• Define clear roles and responsibilities for each member of your team to ensure accountability with Accountability Assignment worksheets
• Eliminate silos, inefficiencies, and redundancies with the one page management strategy
• Set short- and long-term goals that add value to each branch of the company as well as the business as a whole

Plus, gain access to easy-to-use templates to analyze your company’s alignment, including Business and Individual Scorecards, the Competency Worksheet, an Action Plan Commitment chart, and the Performance and Effort Indexes.
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About the author

DR. RIAZ KHADEM is the founder and CEO of Infotrac, a U.S.-based consulting firm that specializes in aligning and transforming organizations.Having spent over 25 years of consulting managers in business strategy deployment, performance management, leadership, and cultural transformation, Dr. Khadem grew inspired to create the Total Alignment management model. Khadem’s work in business strategy provides managers across the globe a succinct model that joins unique concepts, methodologies, and tools together to align their organizations at all levels and transform the way managers work.

This model has since been implemented in organizations across the globe, including U.S., UK, Germany, Spain, Austria, Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil along with several industries such as manufacturing, insurance, and retail. Dr. Khadem has lectured in business forums in several countries. He has held teaching and research positions at Southampton University, Northwestern University, and Universite Laval, and currently holds a doctorate in Applied Mathematics.

LINDA KHADEM is the vice president and in-house counsel of Infotrac, overseeing product trademarks, copyrights, and contracts with clients and representatives worldwide. In addition, she has been instrumental in the evolution of Total Alignment, along with other business strategy books such as One Page Management and previous adaptations of Total Alignment published in Colombia and Brazil.

Along with her work at Infotrac, Khadem pursues justice and education across the nation. She has served as secretary and chairperson of the Baha’I Justice Society, a national organization of 180 attorneys. She has spoken at numerous conferences on the theme of justice and served as the coordinator of refugee children’s classes promoting moral and spiritual education in eleven Atlanta neighborhoods. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from the University of Illinois as well as a degree of Juris Doctor (J.D.) from Emory University and has been educated in the U.S., UK, and Canada.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Entrepreneur Press
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Published on
May 16, 2017
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781613083567
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Management
Business & Economics / Strategic Planning
Business & Economics / Structural Adjustment
Business & Economics / Total Quality Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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