Methods of Mathematical Physics: Partial Differential Equations

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Since the first volume of this work came out in Germany in 1937, this book, together with its first volume, has remained standard in the field. Courant and Hilbert's treatment restores the historically deep connections between physical intuition and mathematical development, providing the reader with a unified approach to mathematical physics. The present volume represents Richard Courant's final revision of 1961.
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About the author

Richard Courant (1888-1972) obtained his doctorate at the University of Göttingen in 1910. Here, he became Hilbert's assistant. He returned to Göttingen to continue his research after World War I, and founded and headed the university's Mathematical Institute. In 1933, Courant left Germany for England, from whence he went on to the United States after a year. In 1936, he became a professor at the New York University. Here, he headed the Department of Mathematics and was Director of the Institute of Mathematical Sciences - which was subsequently renamed the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. Among other things, Courant is well remembered for his achievement regarding the finite element method, which he set on a solid mathematical basis and which is nowadays the most important way to solve partial differential equations numerically.

David Hilbert (1862-1943) received his PhD from the University of Königsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia) in 1884. He remained there until 1895, after which he was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the University of Göttingen. He held this professorship for most of his life. Hilbert is recognized as one of the most influential mathematicians of the 19th and early 20th centuries. His own discoveries alone would have given him that honour, yet it was his leadership in the field of mathematics throughout his later life that distinguishes him. Hilbert's name is given to Infinite-Dimensional space, called Hilbert space, used as a conception for the mathematical analysis of the kinetic gas theory and the theory of radiations.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Sep 26, 2008
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Pages
852
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ISBN
9783527617241
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Physics / General
Science / Physics / Mathematical & Computational
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This content is DRM protected.
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Constance Reid, in Chapter VII of her book Hilbert, tells the story of the writing of the Zahlbericht, as his report entitled Die Theorie der algebra is chen Zahlkorper has always been known. At its annual meeting in 1893 the Deutsche Mathematiker-Vereinigung (the German Mathematical Society) invited Hilbert and Minkowski to prepare a report on the current state of affairs in the theory of numbers, to be completed in two years. The two mathematicians agreed that Minkowski should write about rational number theory and Hilbert about algebraic number theory. Although Hilbert had almost completed his share of the report by the beginning of 1896 Minkowski had made much less progress and it was agreed that he should withdraw from his part of the project. Shortly afterwards Hilbert finished writing his report on algebraic number fields and the manuscript, carefully copied by his wife, was sent to the printers. The proofs were read by Minkowski, aided in part by Hurwitz, slowly and carefully, with close attention to the mathematical exposition as well as to the type-setting; at Minkowski's insistence Hilbert included a note of thanks to his wife. As Constance Reid writes, "The report on algebraic number fields exceeded in every way the expectation of the members of the Mathemati cal Society. They had asked for a summary of the current state of affairs in the theory. They received a masterpiece, which simply and clearly fitted all the difficult developments of recent times into an elegantly integrated theory.
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