Theories of Development, Third Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives, Edition 3

Guilford Publications
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Free sample

This widely adopted text starts with the fundamentals--what is economic growth, what is development, and what is the relationship between these two concepts? The authors examine orthodox theories of growth grounded in different schools of economics (classical, neoclassical, Keynesian, neoliberal) before considering critical alternatives (Marxist, socialist, poststructuralist, and feminist). The book elucidates the basic ideas that underpin contemporary controversies and debates surrounding economic growth, environmental crisis, and global inequality. It highlights points of contention among the various theories and links them to historical and current world events.

New to This Edition
*Reflects the latest data and global development trends, such as the effects on economies of extreme weather events and climate change.
*New discussions throughout the chapters, including the work of Thomas Piketty, Richard Florida, William Easterly, Niall Ferguson, and Arturo Escobar.
*Responds to current crises, including the global financial meltdown and its consequences and the rise of finance capitalism.
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About the author

Richard Peet, PhD, is Professor of Geography at Clark University, where he was a founding member of the “radical geography movement” and long-time editor of Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography. His interests include development, global policy regimes, power, theory and philosophy, political ecology, and finance capitalism. The author of numerous books, articles, and book reviews, Dr. Peet is editor of the radical journal Human Geography.

Elaine Hartwick, PhD, is Professor of Geography at Framingham State University, Massachusetts, where she teaches courses in political, cultural, and regional geography and global development. She has published on commodity chains, consumer politics, social theory and development geography, with a regional specialization on Southern Africa.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Guilford Publications
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Published on
Apr 24, 2015
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Pages
370
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ISBN
9781462519613
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / Economic Development
Business & Economics / Economics / Theory
Social Science / Human Geography
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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How did the industrialized nations of North America and Europe come to be seen as the appropriate models for post-World War II societies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America? How did the postwar discourse on development actually create the so-called Third World? And what will happen when development ideology collapses? To answer these questions, Arturo Escobar shows how development policies became mechanisms of control that were just as pervasive and effective as their colonial counterparts. The development apparatus generated categories powerful enough to shape the thinking even of its occasional critics while poverty and hunger became widespread. "Development" was not even partially "deconstructed" until the 1980s, when new tools for analyzing the representation of social reality were applied to specific "Third World" cases. Here Escobar deploys these new techniques in a provocative analysis of development discourse and practice in general, concluding with a discussion of alternative visions for a postdevelopment era.

Escobar emphasizes the role of economists in development discourse--his case study of Colombia demonstrates that the economization of food resulted in ambitious plans, and more hunger. To depict the production of knowledge and power in other development fields, the author shows how peasants, women, and nature became objects of knowledge and targets of power under the "gaze of experts."


In a substantial new introduction, Escobar reviews debates on globalization and postdevelopment since the book's original publication in 1995 and argues that the concept of postdevelopment needs to be redefined to meet today's significantly new conditions. He then calls for the development of a field of "pluriversal studies," which he illustrates with examples from recent Latin American movements.

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