Ethical Issues in Biotechnology

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2
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Ethical Issues in Biotechnology is the first textbook of its kind, written collaboratively by a philosopher and a biologist to provide undergraduate students with a comprehensive, accessible introduction to the ethical and scientific fundamentals of biotechnology. Engaging the ethics and the science side by side, the text addresses pressing questions in agricultural, food, and animal biotechnology; human genetics; gene therapy; human cloning; and stem cell research. A general introduction to both the moral philosophy and fundamentals of genetics is enhanced throughout the text with section-specific introductions addressing the particular philosophical and scientific challenges posed by the topic under consideration. Diagrams and drawings, study cases, liberal use of practical examples, and suggestions for further reading make the text an ideal resource for a broad range of students interested in issues and questions lying at the intersection of philosophy and genetics.
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About the author

Richard Sherlock is professor of philosophy at Utah State University. John D. Morrey is research professor in the Department of Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences at Utah State University. Professors Sherlock and Morrey team teach an undergraduate course on ethical issues in biotechnology at Utah State.
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Reviews

4.5
2 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Published on
Oct 16, 2002
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Pages
664
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ISBN
9780742578753
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Ethics
Science / Biotechnology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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