Latin America and the Asian Giants: Evolving Ties with China and India

Brookings Institution Press
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How an evolving relationship with China and India is changing Latin America's political and economic dynamics.

In the years since China has adopted a "going global" strategy to promote its overseas investment, expand export markets, and gain much-needed access to natural resources abroad, Sino–Latin American relations have both deepened and broadened at an unexpectedly rapid pace. The main driver behind this sea change in bilateral relations has been economic complementarity, with resource-rich countries in Latin America exporting primary goods to the Asian giants' growing market and China exporting manufactured goods back into the region. In recent years, Sino–Latin American relations have matured considerably, becoming far more nuanced and multifaceted than ever before.

India is a relatively new player in the region, but has slowly strengthened its ties. As one of Asia's largest markets, it offers interesting parallels to the Chinese case. Will Indo–Latin American ties follow a similar path? The main areas of growth include trade and investment, mining, energy, information technology, motor vehicle production, and pharmaceuticals. To what extent these changing dynamics will redefine Latin America's relations with India is a question of increasing relevance for policymakers.

This volume offers a review of key cross-regional trends and critical policy issues involving the changing relationship between these two Asian giants and Latin America. Selected country case studies—Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico—provide a more in-depth analysisof the implications of China's and India's evolving interaction with the region.

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About the author

Riordan Roett is a professor and director of the Latin American Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, D.C.

Guadalupe Paz is an assistant research professor and the associate director of the Latin American Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, D.C.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Sep 27, 2016
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9780815726975
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Globalization
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / International Relations / Trade & Tariffs
Political Science / World / Caribbean & Latin American
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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