Riverhead Books Summer 2013 Insider: A Special Look at Bonus Materials

Riverhead Books is proud to present our Summer 2013 Insider which gives readers more information about the stories behind—or sometimes from within—our Summer 2013 list.
 
Included in the Riverhead Books Summer 2013 Insider are:

  • A Q&A with Khaled Hosseini, author of And the Mountains Echoed, an unforgettable novel about finding a lost piece of yourself in someone else.
     
  • An interview with Pransky, the layabout mutt turned therapy dog at the heart of Sue Halpern’s A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher.
     
  • Ramona Ausubel’s essay, “Transformation,” about the inspiration for A Guide to Being Born, her enthralling new collection that uses the world of the imagination to explore the heart of the human condition.
     
  • “The Story in the Mountains,” an essay by Anton DiSclafani about writing her debut novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, a lush, sexy evocative story of family secrets and girls’-school rituals set in the 1930s South.
     
  • “Looking through the Looking Glass,” an essay by Anna Badkhen on how she came to write The World is a Carpet, her unforgettable portrait of a place and people shaped by centuries of art, trade and war.
     
  • A note from Mark Kurlansky about “Dancing in the Street,” the iconic song he uses as a lens to examine the story of the civil rights movement’s genesis in his new book, Ready for a Brand New Beat
     
  • Matthew Berry’s essay, “It’s Fantasy Sports World, You Just Live in It,” about the growing world of fantasy sports and how it has shaped his career and personal life which he details in his new book, Fantasy Life.
     
  • “Noodles of the Silk Road,” a field guide by Jen Lin-Liu, author of On the Noodle Road, in which she immerses herself in a moveable feast of foods and cultures and discovers some surprising truths about commitment, independence, and love
     
  • A brief history of the historic raid on Harper’s Ferry which plays a key role in James McBride’s new novel, The Good Lord Bird, the story of a young boy born a slave who joins John Brown’s antislavery crusade—and who must pass as a girl to survive.
     
  • Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s essay, “Memories of the Years of Chaos,” about how Colombia’s recent history informs his new novel, The Sound of Things Falling

Each of these pieces is an engaging and informative introduction to these truly wonderful books.
 

Read more

About the author

Founded in 1994 by Susan Petersen Kennedy, Riverhead Books is now well-established as a publisher of bestselling literary fiction and quality non-fiction. Throughout its history, Riverhead Books has been dedicated to publishing extraordinary, ground-breaking, unique fiction and non-fiction writers. Riverhead's books have won Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Critic Circle Awards, and numerous other distinctions.
Read more

Reviews

1.0
2 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
Read more
Published on
May 7, 2013
Read more
Pages
24
Read more
ISBN
9780698141643
Read more
Features
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Literary
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Literary Collections / American / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
James McBride
National Book Award winner James McBride goes in search of the “real” James Brown after receiving a tip that promises to uncover the man behind the myth. His surprising journey illuminates not only our understanding of this immensely troubled, misunderstood, and complicated soul genius but the ways in which our cultural heritage has been shaped by Brown’s legacy.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST

Kill ’Em and Leave is more than a book about James Brown. Brown’s rough-and-tumble life, through McBride’s lens, is an unsettling metaphor for American life: the tension between North and South, black and white, rich and poor. McBride’s travels take him to forgotten corners of Brown’s never-before-revealed history: the country town where Brown’s family and thousands of others were displaced by America’s largest nuclear power bomb-making facility; a South Carolina field where a long-forgotten cousin recounts, in the dead of night, a fuller history of Brown’s sharecropping childhood, which until now has been a mystery. McBride seeks out the American expatriate in England who co-created the James Brown sound, visits the trusted right-hand manager who worked with Brown for forty-one years, and interviews Brown’s most influential nonmusical creation, his “adopted son,” the Reverend Al Sharpton. He describes the stirring visit of Michael Jackson to the Augusta, Georgia, funeral home where the King of Pop sat up all night with the body of his musical godfather, spends hours talking with Brown’s first wife, and lays bare the Dickensian legal contest over James Brown’s estate, a fight that has consumed careers; prevented any money from reaching the poor schoolchildren in Georgia and South Carolina, as instructed in his will; cost Brown’s estate millions in legal fees; and left James Brown’s body to lie for more than eight years in a gilded coffin in his daughter’s yard in South Carolina.

James McBride is one of the most distinctive and electric literary voices in America today, and part of the pleasure of his narrative is being in his presence, coming to understand Brown through McBride’s own insights as a black musician with Southern roots. Kill ’Em and Leave is a song unearthing and celebrating James Brown’s great legacy: the cultural landscape of America today.

Praise for Kill ’Em and Leave

“Thoughtful and probing . . . with great warmth, insight and frequent wit.”—Rick Moody, The New York Times Book Review

“[McBride] turns out to also be the biographer of James Brown we’ve all been waiting for. . . . McBride’s true subject is race and poverty in a country that doesn’t want to hear about it, unless compelled by a voice that demands to be heard.”—Boris Kachka, New York

“The definitive look at one of the greatest, most important entertainers, The Godfather, Da Number One Soul Brother, Mr. Please, Please Himself—JAMES BROWN.”—Spike Lee

“A feat of intrepid journalistic fortitude.”—USA Today
 
“This is an important book about an important figure in American musical history and about American culture. . . . You won’t leave this hypnotic book without feeling that James Brown is still out there, howling.”—The Boston Globe
 
“Illuminating . . . engaging.”—The Washington Post
Anton DiSclafani
“This summer’s first romantic page turner.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

Named a most anticipated book for Summer 2013 by The Wall Street Journaland Publishers Weekly and USA Today, NPR, and People summer reads pick

From the author of The After Party, a lush, sexy, evocative debut novel of family secrets and girls’-school rituals, set in the 1930s South.


It is 1930, the midst of the Great Depression. After her mysterious role in a family tragedy, passionate, strong-willed Thea Atwell, age fifteen, has been cast out of her Florida home, exiled to an equestrienne boarding school for Southern debutantes. High in the Blue Ridge Mountains, with its complex social strata ordered by money, beauty, and girls’ friendships, the Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a far remove from the free-roaming, dreamlike childhood Thea shared with her twin brother on their family’s citrus farm—a world now partially shattered. As Thea grapples with her responsibility for the events of the past year that led her here, she finds herself enmeshed in a new order, one that will change her sense of what is possible for herself, her family, her country.

Weaving provocatively between home and school, the narrative powerfully unfurls the true story behind Thea’s expulsion from her family, but it isn’t long before the mystery of her past is rivaled by the question of how it will shape her future. Part scandalous love story, part heartbreaking family drama, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is an immersive, transporting page-turner—a vivid, propulsive novel about sex, love, family, money, class, home, and horses, all set against the ominous threat of the Depression—and the major debut of an important new writer.
James McBride
One of The New York Times' 100 Notable Books of 2017

“A pinball machine zinging with sharp dialogue, breathtaking plot twists and naughty humor... McBride at his brave and joyous best.” —New York Times Book Review

Exciting new fiction from James McBride, the first since his National Book Award–winning novel The Good Lord Bird.
 
The stories in Five-Carat Soul—none of them ever published before—spring from the place where identity, humanity, and history converge. They’re funny and poignant, insightful and unpredictable, imaginative and authentic—all told with McBride’s unrivaled storytelling skill and meticulous eye for character and detail. McBride explores the ways we learn from the world and the people around us. An antiques dealer discovers that a legendary toy commissioned by Civil War General Robert E. Lee now sits in the home of a black minister in Queens. Five strangers find themselves thrown together and face unexpected judgment. An American president draws inspiration from a conversation he overhears in a stable. And members of The Five-Carat Soul Bottom Bone Band recount stories from their own messy and hilarious lives. 
 
As McBride did in his National Book award-winning The Good Lord Bird and his bestselling The Color of Water, he writes with humor and insight about how we struggle to understand who we are in a world we don’t fully comprehend. The result is a surprising, perceptive, and evocative collection of stories that is also a moving exploration of our human condition.
Anton DiSclafani
Joan Fortier es el paradigma del glamour tejano y el centro de la escena social del Houston de los años cincuenta. Alta, rubia, bella y enérgica, destaca en los salones y su nombre está en boca de todos. Los hombres la desean y las mujeres quieren ser ella, pero ese mundo opulento, con sus clubes de campo y sus bailes de presentación en sociedad, tiene reglas estrictas. El dinero fluye tan libremente como el petróleo, pero la libertad y el poder son patrimonio de los hombres. ¿Qué sucede cuando una mujer de apetitos y deseos indecorosos como Joan quiere más? Cece Buchanan, amiga de Joan desde la infancia, vive pendiente de ella, alternando entre la crítica y la complicidad. Cuando la conducta de Joan se radicaliza, Cece se ve enfrentada a difíciles decisiones. Las buenas amigas no solo es una disección tan excitante como memorable de los círculos en que se mueven los ricos, bellos y famosos, sino la historiade una amistad tan obsesiva, apasionada y devoradora como una historia de amor. «DiSclafani es una maestra a la hora de crear suspense y de revelar mundos privados mediante detalles inesperados y elocuentes.» The New York Times «Las buenas amigas resplandece como los enormes diamantes que lucen sus personajes.» People «Las buenas amigas explora el deseo femenino que amenaza el statu quo.» The Washington Post «Un poco de Mad Men, un poco de Carol y mucho erotismo.»Tampa Bay Times «La historia nos sumerge en una época y un lugar deslumbrantes y algo decadentes.» The Houston Chronicle «Esta excitante lectura se disfruta con la misma facilidad que un daiquiri.» Cosmopolitan «Dos mujeres que se enfrentan a la sociedad tejana de los años cincuenta, y todo el glamour y los escándalos que las acompañan.»Boston Magazine «Una historia sobre la vida, el amor y la amistad en una sociedad opulenta.»Houston Press «DiSclafani pinta un rico retrato de una sociedad cerrada en sí misma y sus decadentes miembros en una narración absorbente.» Kirkus Reviews
©2017 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.