The Psychology of Fatigue: Work, Effort and Control

Cambridge University Press
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Fatigue can have a major impact on an individual's performance and well-being, yet is poorly understood, even within the scientific community. There is no developed theory of its origins or functions, and different types of fatigue (mental, physical, sleepiness) are routinely confused. The widespread interpretation of fatigue as a negative consequence of work may be true only for externally imposed goals; meaningful or self-initiated work is rarely tiring and often invigorating. In the first book dedicated to the systematic treatment of fatigue for over sixty years, Robert Hockey examines its many aspects - social history, neuroscience, energetics, exercise physiology, sleep and clinical implications - and develops a new motivational control theory, in which fatigue is treated as an emotion having a fundamental adaptive role in the management of goals. He then uses this new perspective to explore the role of fatigue in relation to individual motivation, working life and well-being.
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About the author

Robert Hockey is Emeritus Professor of Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering in the Department of Psychology at Sheffield University. His research on human attention and performance, workload, stress and fatigue has emphasized the adaptive nature of human regulatory activity in task performance, and he has acted as a consultant in the maritime, rail, nuclear and space industries. He has published over 170 research articles and edited or written six books, including Stress and Fatigue in Human Performance (1983).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
May 16, 2013
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Pages
307
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ISBN
9781107244238
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Cognitive Psychology & Cognition
Psychology / Experimental Psychology
Psychology / General
Psychology / Physiological Psychology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The definitive firsthand account of the groundbreaking research of Philip Zimbardo—the basis for the award-winning film The Stanford Prison Experiment

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From the Hardcover edition.
"As the fundamental importance of psychological aspects of medical practice becomes ever more evident, and a correspondingly greater knowledge of psychology is required of medical graduates, books like this one must become essential reading for all medical students."
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With a full colour text design, each chapter follows the same accessible format which includes summaries, learning objectives, case studies, research examples, applications to clinical practice, further reading and short answer questions. They include the latest psychological theory and research evidence.

Health care is under tremendous pressure regarding efficiency, safety, and economic viability. It has responded by adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean production, and high reliability – although with limited, and all-too-often disappointing, results. The Resilient Health Care Network (RHCN) has worked since 2011 to facilitate the interaction and collaboration among practitioners and researchers interested in applying concepts from resilience engineering to health care and patient safety. This has met with considerable success, not least because the focus from the start was on developing concrete ways to complement a Safety-I perspective with a Safety-II perspective.

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A groundbreaking and revelatory history of psychotropic drugs, from "a thoroughly exhilarating and entertaining writer" (Washington Post).

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