American Exceptionalism and American Innocence: A People's History of Fake News—From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror

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“Fake news existed long before Donald Trump…. What is ironic is that fake news has indeed been the only news disseminated by the rulers of U.S. empire.”—From American Exceptionalism and American Innocence

According to Robert Sirvent and Danny Haiphong, Americans have been exposed to fake news throughout our history—news that slavery is a thing of the past, that we don’t live on stolen land, that wars are fought to spread freedom and democracy, that a rising tide lifts all boats, that prisons keep us safe, and that the police serve and protect.

Thus, the only “news” ever reported by various channels of U.S. empire is the news of American exceptionalism and American innocence. And, as this book will hopefully show, it’s all fake.

Did the U.S. really “save the world” in World War II? Should black athletes stop protesting and show more gratitude for what America has done for them? Are wars fought to spread freedom and democracy? Or is this all fake news?

American Exceptionalism and American Innocence examines the stories we’re told that lead us to think that the U.S. is a force for good in the world, regardless of slavery, the genocide of indigenous people, and the more than a century’s worth of imperialist war that the U.S. has wrought on the planet.

Sirvent and Haiphong detail just what Captain America’s shield tells us about the pretensions of U.S. foreign policy, how Angelina Jolie and Bill Gates engage in humanitarian imperialism, and why the Broadway musical Hamilton is a monument to white supremacy.
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About the author

Roberto Sirvent, Ph. D., J.D., is a Professor of Political and Social Ethics at Hope International University in Fullerton, California.

Danny Haiphong is an activist and a regular contributor to The Black Agenda Report.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Apr 2, 2019
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781510742376
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / 19th Century
History / United States / 20th Century
History / United States / General
Political Science / American Government / Executive Branch
Political Science / American Government / General
Political Science / American Government / Judicial Branch
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Democracy
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Nationalism & Patriotism
Political Science / Political Process / Campaigns & Elections
Political Science / Political Process / Media & Internet
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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