Living with Hitler: Compelling recollections of Hitler's personal staff

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his collection paints a picture of Hitler from members of his household in the unique position of being “seemingly ever present, yet totally unconnected to events.”

Compelling recollections from Hitler’s Bodyguard Karl Krause (1934-39), his house administrator Herbert Döhring (1935-43) and chambermaid Anna Plaim (1941-43). From these accounts we get a deeper sense of Hitler in close proximity.

These accounts massively add to our understanding of Hitler as a three dimensional character, especially from subjects like Plaim who only knew Hitler’s home life, having rarely left Berghof.

The authors shed light on his likes and dislikes from foods to his hobbies, creating a strange sense of humanity. This collection also provides fresh anecdotes, observations and portraits of Hitler’s entourage and relatives. Plaim’s images of Eva Braun came from finding torn fragments in the bin, whilst Döhring sheds light on Martin Bormann’s demeanour.

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About the author

Roger Moorhouse is a leading historian of Nazism and World War II. He is the author of three acclaimed booked and has made a number of television appearances, given important lectures regarding the Final Solution and is a regular commentator for the press.

Karl Krause was born in 1911 and became Hitler’s valet and bodyguard in 1934. He died in 2001.

Herbert Döhring was born in 1913, and from 1935-1943 served as Hitler’s Housekeeper. He died in 2001.

Anna Plaim was born in 1920 and became a maid in Berghof in 1941.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Big Sky Publishing
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Published on
Jun 1, 2019
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781922265135
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Military
History / Europe / Germany
History / General
History / Military / General
History / Military / Wars & Conflicts (Other)
History / Military / World War II
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The first installment of Bernard Cornwell’s New York Times bestselling series chronicling the epic saga of the making of England, “like Game of Thrones, but real” (The Observer, London)—the basis for The Last Kingdom, the hit  Netflix series.

This is the exciting—yet little known—story of the making of England in the 9th and 10th centuries, the years in which King Alfred the Great, his son and grandson defeated the Danish Vikings who had invaded and occupied three of England’s four kingdoms.

The story is seen through the eyes of Uhtred, a dispossessed nobleman, who is captured as a child by the Danes and then raised by them so that, by the time the Northmen begin their assault on Wessex (Alfred’s kingdom and the last territory in English hands) Uhtred almost thinks of himself as a Dane. He certainly has no love for Alfred, whom he considers a pious weakling and no match for Viking savagery, yet when Alfred unexpectedly defeats the Danes and the Danes themselves turn on Uhtred, he is finally forced to choose sides. By now he is a young man, in love, trained to fight and ready to take his place in the dreaded shield wall. Above all, though, he wishes to recover his father’s land, the enchanting fort of Bebbanburg by the wild northern sea.

This thrilling adventure—based on existing records of Bernard Cornwell’s ancestors—depicts a time when law and order were ripped violently apart by a pagan assault on Christian England, an assault that came very close to destroying England.

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It is also the remarkable, terrible story of the survival of a tyrant against all the odds, an evil dictator whose repeated escapes from almost certain death convinced him that he was literally invincible–a conviction that had appalling consequences for millions.
“A thrilling action ride of a book” (The New York Times Book Review)—from Jerry Bruckheimer in theaters everywhere January 19, 2018—the New York Times bestselling, true-life account of a US Special Forces team deployed to dangerous, war-ridden Afghanistan in the weeks following 9/11.

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During a surrender of six hundred Taliban troops, the Horse Soldiers were ambushed by the would-be POWs. Dangerously overpowered, they fought for their lives in the city’s immense fortress, Qala-i-Janghi, or the House of War. At risk were the military gains of the entire campaign: if the soldiers perished or were captured, the entire effort to outmaneuver the Taliban was likely doomed.

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With 24 pages of photographs, 2 endpaper maps, and 15 maps in text
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