Gifts from the Thunder Beings: Indigenous Archery and European Firearms in the Northern Plains and Central Subarctic, 1670-1870

U of Nebraska Press
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Gifts from the Thunder Beings examines North American Aboriginal peoplesê use of Indigenous and European distance weapons in big-game hunting and combat. Beyond the capabilities of European weapons, Aboriginal peoplesê ways of adapting and using this technology in combination with Indigenous weaponry contributed greatly to the impact these weapons had on Aboriginal cultures. This gradual transition took place from the beginning of the fur trade in the Hudsonês Bay Company trading territory to the treaty and reserve period that began in Canada in the 1870s.

Technological change and the effects of European contact were not uniform throughout North America, as Roland Bohr illustrates by comparing the northern Great Plains and the Central Subarcticãtwo adjacent but environmentally different regions of North Americaãand their respective Indigenous cultures. Beginning with a brief survey of the subarctic and Northern Plains environments and the most common subsistence strategies in these regions around the time of contact, Bohr provides the context for a detailed examination of social, spiritual, and cultural aspects of bows, arrows, quivers, and firearms. His detailed analysis of the shifting usage of bows and arrows and firearms in the northern Great Plains and the Central Subarctic makes Gifts from the Thunder Beings an important addition to the canon of North American ethnology.

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About the author

Roland Bohr is an associate professor of history and the director of the Centre for Rupertês Land Studies at the University of Winnipeg.

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Additional Information

Publisher
U of Nebraska Press
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Published on
May 1, 2014
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Pages
504
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ISBN
9780803254374
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Canada / Pre-Confederation (to 1867)
History / Military / Other
History / United States / State & Local / Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI)
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
Technology & Engineering / Military Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Allan Greer
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Graham Harris
Pierre Berton
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Roland Bohr
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