Modern Trends in Human Leukemia VII: New Results in Clinical and Biological Research Including Pediatric Oncology

Springer Science & Business Media
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Organized on behalf of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hämatologie und Onkologie, Hamburg, June 27/28, 1986
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
524
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ISBN
9783642726248
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / Endocrinology & Metabolism
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This content is DRM protected.
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You see things, and sa)' why? But I dream 1hings that never were, and I say, 11'hy 110t? George Bernhard Shaw Far ahead of his time, June 1st, 1909, Alexander Maximov communicated in a lecture, given in the Charite in Berlin, the fundamental knowledge, that there exists a lymphoid hemopoetic stem cell. Alexander Friedenstein explained that during the following years, Maximov also showed that the idea of interaction between hemopoetic cells and their stroma to be one of the most significant experiences. Monoclonal antibodies, recombinant DNA technics and the improvement of tissue culture models are the major developments to improve our possibilities to clarify growth and differentiation functions of hemopoetic cells. During the last two decades it was shown that soluble products, released from T cells, were not only involved in inducing B cells to produce specific immunoglobulin secretion after antigen stimulation. Furthermore, lymphokines together with other cytokines regulate the growth and differentiation of hemopoetic cells. As I have learned from Dick Gershon, our knowledge of the cellular basis for immunoregulation has come a long way since 450 B.C. Thucydides comments on the possible role of immune response in controlling the Black Death. Dick Gershon speculated that no scientific interest for these interesting observations was put forth at that time. Perhaps the problems, the Athenians were having with the Spartans, converted money from basis research into the military budget.
For decades retroviruses have been riding the crest of a wave of experimental research directed toward the identification of an infectious agent of human neoplastic diseases. In the early 1970s, several scientists successfully demonstrated the presence of retroviruses in numerous animal species and proved their etiological role in some related diseases. Corresponding findings in humans were somewhat discouraging. Although financial support for this line· of research declined, a few dedicated retrovirologists survived and continued to collect more biological information and technological expertise that opened a new approach to the search for a human retrovirus. The rewards came with the discovery that the genes responsible for neoplastic transformation (oncogenes) are of cellular origin and can be shuttled about by retroviruses, and with the identification of a new family of Human T-cell Lymphotrophic retroViruses (HTLV) from patients with diseases ranging from leukemia to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An understanding of the role and significance of retroviruses in human pathology requires basic knowledge of the major animal systems studied. With this perspective in mind, we present here a survey that includes general overviews, minireviews on each animal system studied with selected experimental reports and, finally, a stimulating review of the field of human retrovirology by many of the pioneer scientists who created it. We are especially grateful to Profs. C. A. Romanzi and G. C. Schito for promoting the organization of the Symposium. On behalf of the Sym posium Committee, we thank E. Soeri, L. Casarino, G. P. Gesu, M.
For decades retroviruses have been riding the crest of a wave of experimental research directed toward the identification of an infectious agent of human neoplastic diseases. In the early 1970s, several scientists successfully demonstrated the presence of retroviruses in numerous animal species and proved their etiological role in some related diseases. Corresponding findings in humans were somewhat discouraging. Although financial support for this line· of research declined, a few dedicated retrovirologists survived and continued to collect more biological information and technological expertise that opened a new approach to the search for a human retrovirus. The rewards came with the discovery that the genes responsible for neoplastic transformation (oncogenes) are of cellular origin and can be shuttled about by retroviruses, and with the identification of a new family of Human T-cell Lymphotrophic retroViruses (HTLV) from patients with diseases ranging from leukemia to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An understanding of the role and significance of retroviruses in human pathology requires basic knowledge of the major animal systems studied. With this perspective in mind, we present here a survey that includes general overviews, minireviews on each animal system studied with selected experimental reports and, finally, a stimulating review of the field of human retrovirology by many of the pioneer scientists who created it. We are especially grateful to Profs. C. A. Romanzi and G. C. Schito for promoting the organization of the Symposium. On behalf of the Sym posium Committee, we thank E. Soeri, L. Casarino, G. P. Gesu, M.
You see things, and sa)' why? But I dream 1hings that never were, and I say, 11'hy 110t? George Bernhard Shaw Far ahead of his time, June 1st, 1909, Alexander Maximov communicated in a lecture, given in the Charite in Berlin, the fundamental knowledge, that there exists a lymphoid hemopoetic stem cell. Alexander Friedenstein explained that during the following years, Maximov also showed that the idea of interaction between hemopoetic cells and their stroma to be one of the most significant experiences. Monoclonal antibodies, recombinant DNA technics and the improvement of tissue culture models are the major developments to improve our possibilities to clarify growth and differentiation functions of hemopoetic cells. During the last two decades it was shown that soluble products, released from T cells, were not only involved in inducing B cells to produce specific immunoglobulin secretion after antigen stimulation. Furthermore, lymphokines together with other cytokines regulate the growth and differentiation of hemopoetic cells. As I have learned from Dick Gershon, our knowledge of the cellular basis for immunoregulation has come a long way since 450 B.C. Thucydides comments on the possible role of immune response in controlling the Black Death. Dick Gershon speculated that no scientific interest for these interesting observations was put forth at that time. Perhaps the problems, the Athenians were having with the Spartans, converted money from basis research into the military budget.
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