Game 7, 1986: Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life

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New York Times Bestseller

Every little kid who's ever taken the mound in Little League dreams of someday getting the ball for Game Seven of the World Series. Ron Darling got to live that dream - only it didn't go exactly as planned. In New York Times bestselling Game 7, 1986, the award-winning baseball analyst looks back at what might have been a signature moment in his career, and reflects on the ways professional athletes must sometimes shoulder a personal disappointment as his team finds a way to win. Published to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the 1986 New York Mets championship season, Darling's book will break down one of baseball's great "forgotten" games - a game that stands as a thrilling, telling and tantalizing exclamation point to one of the best-remember seasons in Major League Baseball history. Working once again with New York Times best-selling collaborator Daniel Paisner, who teamed with the former All-Star pitcher on his acclaimed 2009 memoir Game 7, 1986, Darling offers a book for the thinking baseball fan, a chance to reflect on what it means to compete at the game's highest level, with everything on the line.

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About the author

Ron Darling is the New York Times bestselling author of Game 7, 1986 and The Complete Game as well as an Emmy Award-winning baseball analyst for TBS, the MLB Network, SNY, and WPIX-TV. He was a starting pitcher for the New York Mets from 1983 to 1991 and the first Mets pitcher to be awarded a Gold Glove.

Daniel Paisner has collaborated with dozens of athletes and public figures on their autobiographies and memoirs, including I Feel Like Going On, with NFL great Ray Lewis; and, Chasing Perfect, with Hall of Fame basketball coach Bob Hurley.

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Additional Information

Publisher
St. Martin's Press
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Published on
Apr 5, 2016
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9781466878105
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Sports
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / Essays & Writings
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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