Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected

YMAA Publication Center, Inc.
2
Free sample

This book stands alone as an introduction to the context of self-defense. There are seven elements that must be addressed to bring self-defense training to something approaching ‘complete.’ Training that dismisses any of these areas leaves you vulnerable:
Legal and ethical implications. To learn self-defense, you must learn force law. The consequence is prison. Side by side with the legal rules, everyone must explore his or her own ethical limitations. Most people don’t really know where this ethical line lies within them.
Violence dynamics. Self-defense must teach how attacks happen. You must be able to recognize an attack before it happens and know what kind you are facing.
Avoidance. You need to learn and practice not-fighting. Learning includes escape and evasion, verbal de-escalation, and also pure not-be-there avoidance.
Counter-ambush. If you didn’t see the precursors or couldn’t successfully avoid the encounter, you will need a handful of actions, trained to reflex level, to deal with a sudden violent attack.
Breaking the freeze. Freezing is almost universal in a sudden attack. You must learn to recognize a freeze and break out of one.
The fight itself. Most martial arts and self-defense instructors concentrate their time on the fight. It just needs to be in line with how violence really happens in the world.
The aftermath. There are potential legal, psychological, and medical effects of engaging in violence no matter how justified. Advanced preparation is critical.
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About the author

Rory Miller has been studying martial arts since 1981. He’s a bestselling writer and a veteran corrections officer. He’s taught and designed courses on Use of Force Policy and Decision Making; Police Defensive Tactics; Confrontational Simulations; and as a sergeant, he led and trained his former agency’s Corrections Tactical Team. In 2008 and 2009, he taught methods to operate a secure prison for the Iraqi Corrections Systems, Iraq. Rory Miller resides near Portland, Oregon.

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Additional Information

Publisher
YMAA Publication Center, Inc.
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Published on
Apr 1, 2014
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Pages
242
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ISBN
9781594392375
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Law Enforcement
Sports & Recreation / Martial Arts & Self-Defense
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Rory Miller
The speed and brutality of a predatory attack can shock even an experienced martial artist. The sudden chaos, the cascade of stress hormones—you feel as though time slows down. In reality, the assault is over in an instant. How does anyone prepare for that?

As a former corrections sergeant and tactical team leader, Rory Miller is a proven survivor. He instructs police and corrections professionals who, in many cases, receive only eight hours of defensive tactics training each year. They need techniques that work and they need unflinching courage.

In Training for Sudden Violence: 72 Practical Drills Miller gives you the tools to prepare and prevail, both physically and psychologically. He shares hard-won lessons from a world most of us hope we never experience.

• Train in fundamentals, combat drills, and dynamic fighting.
• Develop situational awareness.
• Condition yourself through stress inoculation.
• Take a critical look at your training habits.

“You don’t get to pick where fights go,” Miller writes. That’s why he has created a series of drills to train you for the worst of it. You will defend yourself on your feet, on the ground, against weapons, in a crowd, and while blindfolded. You will reevaluate your training scenarios—keeping what works, discarding what does not, and improving your chances of survival.

Miller’s “internal work,” “world work,” and “plastic mind” exercises will challenge you in ways that mere physical training does not. Sections include

• Stalking
• Escape and evasion
• The predator mind
• Personal threat assessment

This is a fight for your life, and it won’t happen on a nice soft mat. It will get, as Miller says, “all kinds of messy.” Training for Sudden Violence: 72 Practical Drills prepares you for that mess.
Rory Miller
A Comparison of Martial Arts Training & Real-World Violence.

Experienced martial artist and veteran correction officer Sgt. Rory Miller distills what he has learned from jailhouse brawls, tactical operations and ambushes to explore the differences between martial arts and the subject martial arts were designed to deal with: Violence.

In section one, Sgt. Miller introduces the myths, metaphors and expectations that most martial artists have about what they will ultimately learn in their dojo. This is then compared with the complexity of the reality of violence. Complexity is one of the recurring themes throughout this work. Section two examines how to think critically about violence, how to evaluate sources of knowledge and clearly explains the concepts of strategy and tactics. Sections three and four focus on the dynamics of violence itself and the predators who perpetuate it. Drawing on hundreds of encounters and thousands of hours spent with criminals Sgt. Miller explains the types of violence; how, where, when and why it develops; the effects of adrenaline; how criminals think, and even the effects of drugs and altered states of consciousness in a fight. Section five centers on training for violence, and adapting your present training methods to that reality. It discusses the pros and cons of modern and ancient martial arts training and gives a unique insight into early Japanese kata as a military training method. Section six is all about how to make self-defense work. Miller examines how to look at defense in a broader context, and how to overcome some of your own subconscious resistance to meeting violence with violence. The last section deals with the aftermath—the cost of surviving sudden violence or violent environments, how it can change you for good or bad. It gives advice for supervisors and even for instructors on how to help a student/survivor. You’ll even learn a bit about enlightenment.

Rory Miller has served for seventeen years in corrections as an officer and sergeant working maximum security, booking and mental health; leading a tactical team; and teaching subjects ranging from Defensive Tactics and Use of Force to First Aid and Crisis Communications with the Mentally Ill.
Rory Miller
A Comparison of Martial Arts Training & Real-World Violence.

Experienced martial artist and veteran correction officer Sgt. Rory Miller distills what he has learned from jailhouse brawls, tactical operations and ambushes to explore the differences between martial arts and the subject martial arts were designed to deal with: Violence.

In section one, Sgt. Miller introduces the myths, metaphors and expectations that most martial artists have about what they will ultimately learn in their dojo. This is then compared with the complexity of the reality of violence. Complexity is one of the recurring themes throughout this work. Section two examines how to think critically about violence, how to evaluate sources of knowledge and clearly explains the concepts of strategy and tactics. Sections three and four focus on the dynamics of violence itself and the predators who perpetuate it. Drawing on hundreds of encounters and thousands of hours spent with criminals Sgt. Miller explains the types of violence; how, where, when and why it develops; the effects of adrenaline; how criminals think, and even the effects of drugs and altered states of consciousness in a fight. Section five centers on training for violence, and adapting your present training methods to that reality. It discusses the pros and cons of modern and ancient martial arts training and gives a unique insight into early Japanese kata as a military training method. Section six is all about how to make self-defense work. Miller examines how to look at defense in a broader context, and how to overcome some of your own subconscious resistance to meeting violence with violence. The last section deals with the aftermath—the cost of surviving sudden violence or violent environments, how it can change you for good or bad. It gives advice for supervisors and even for instructors on how to help a student/survivor. You’ll even learn a bit about enlightenment.

Rory Miller has served for seventeen years in corrections as an officer and sergeant working maximum security, booking and mental health; leading a tactical team; and teaching subjects ranging from Defensive Tactics and Use of Force to First Aid and Crisis Communications with the Mentally Ill.
Rory Miller
The speed and brutality of a predatory attack can shock even an experienced martial artist. The sudden chaos, the cascade of stress hormones—you feel as though time slows down. In reality, the assault is over in an instant. How does anyone prepare for that?

As a former corrections sergeant and tactical team leader, Rory Miller is a proven survivor. He instructs police and corrections professionals who, in many cases, receive only eight hours of defensive tactics training each year. They need techniques that work and they need unflinching courage.

In Training for Sudden Violence: 72 Practical Drills Miller gives you the tools to prepare and prevail, both physically and psychologically. He shares hard-won lessons from a world most of us hope we never experience.

• Train in fundamentals, combat drills, and dynamic fighting.
• Develop situational awareness.
• Condition yourself through stress inoculation.
• Take a critical look at your training habits.

“You don’t get to pick where fights go,” Miller writes. That’s why he has created a series of drills to train you for the worst of it. You will defend yourself on your feet, on the ground, against weapons, in a crowd, and while blindfolded. You will reevaluate your training scenarios—keeping what works, discarding what does not, and improving your chances of survival.

Miller’s “internal work,” “world work,” and “plastic mind” exercises will challenge you in ways that mere physical training does not. Sections include

• Stalking
• Escape and evasion
• The predator mind
• Personal threat assessment

This is a fight for your life, and it won’t happen on a nice soft mat. It will get, as Miller says, “all kinds of messy.” Training for Sudden Violence: 72 Practical Drills prepares you for that mess.
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