Until The Daylight: A Berlin Comic

CG Web Design
4

UNTIL THE DAYLIGHT - A BERLIN COMIC. AN INTOXICATING 52-PAGE COMIC BOOK FEATURING AN UNFORGETTABLE STORY OF A HEDONISTIC NIGHT IN BERLIN

This comic tells the story of two men whose lives intersect during a night in Berlin, “a city where the old feel young, the lost are found and where you can lose yourself”. An experience that moves between the soft lights of Kneipe and the psychedelic atmospheres of techno clubs, where dreams and illusions coincide, pregnant with smoke and kaleidoscopic colours, weaving through different levels of reality, leading you to a surprising “finale”.

The Berghain Club in Berlin, the club our protagonists visit, might have several stories like this in its history and the comic puts together this story of celebration of life in a sexy and flawless manner. Gay, Straight, Bi, whatever, anyone who has lived in the nightlife of a big city can relate to this story.  

*LOSE YOURSELF IN THE NIGHT*

● 52 HIGH DEFINITION PAGES - 'Until The Daylight - A Berlin Comic' was lovingly drawn over 2 years in the city of Berlin by artist Rosario Salerno. 

RECOMMENDED FOR MATURE READERS


Words that might excite: Gay, Fun, Nightlife, Berghain, Techno, Music LGBT, Bliss, Ecstasy, Clubbing, Dancing, Dramatic, Surprise, Berlin

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About the author

Rosario Salerno is an Italian artist based in Berlin. He works using several media and techniques, such as sculptures and drawing, passing through different linguistic and thematic strands, sharing a common way of feeling, of expressing moods, attitudes and emotions, without intending to define the canons of a ‘specific erotic’ art. In addition to pursuing his work as a sculptor, he furthers his skills in visual arts through illustrations and comics too. He works on his individual projects and also on commissioned works.

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Additional Information

Publisher
CG Web Design
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Published on
Mar 1, 2015
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Pages
56
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Techniques / Cartooning
Comics & Graphic Novels / General
Comics & Graphic Novels / LGBT
Fiction / Gay
Fiction / General
Fiction / Romance / Gay
Music / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reading information

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2014 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

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