Gittin' Through: A Southern Town During World War Ii

Trafford Publishing
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GittinThrough sets this turning point in American history in a small southern town where traditions, class and race defined its citizens and the roles they played. It shows how the three generations coped with the conflict while they made a living, reared their families, took care of the elderly, fell in love, lost loved ones, struggled to hold a marriage together, and choose right and wrong ways to profit from the war. Like all generations, they carried the burdens of the past into their own times in order to prepare for the future.
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About the author

Roy T. Matthews grew up in Franklin, Virginia. He holds degrees from Washington and Lee University, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. A retired Professor from Michigan State, he and his wife, LeeAnn, live in Washington, DC. They have two children and three grandsons.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Trafford Publishing
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Published on
Aug 2, 2011
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Pages
500
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ISBN
9781426974373
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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