Roots of Brazil

University of Notre Dame Pess
Free sample

Sérgio Buarque de Holanda's Roots of Brazil is one of the iconic books on Brazilian history, society, and culture. Originally published in 1936, it appears here for the first time in an English language translation with a foreword, "Why Read Roots of Brazil Today?" by Pedro Meira Monteiro, one of the world's leading experts on Buarque de Holanda. Roots of Brazil focuses on the multiple cultural influences that forged twentieth-century Brazil, especially those of the Portuguese, the Spanish, other European colonists, Native Americans, and Africans. Buarque de Holanda argues that all of these originary influences were transformed into a unique Brazilian culture and society—a "transition zone." The book presents an understanding of why and how European culture flourished in a large, tropical environment that was totally foreign to its traditions, and the manner and consequences of this development. Buarque de Holanda uses Max Weber’s typological criteria to establish pairs of "ideal types" as a means of stressing particular characteristics of Brazilians, while also trying to understand and explain the local historical process. Along with other early twentieth-century works such as The Masters and the Slaves by Gilberto Freyre and The Colonial Background of Modern Brazil by Caio Prado Júnior, Roots of Brazil set the parameters of Brazilian historiography for a generation and continues to offer keys to understanding the complex history of Brazil. Roots of Brazil has been published in Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese, German, and French. This long-awaited English translation will interest students and scholars of Portuguese, Brazilian, and Latin American history, culture, literature, and postcolonial studies.
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About the author

Sérgio Buarque de Holanda (1902–1982) was one of the most renowned Brazilian historians of the twentieth century, as well as a noted literary critic. He taught in Italy, the United States, Chile, and Brazil.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Notre Dame Pess
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Published on
Aug 29, 2012
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9780268077648
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Latin America / South America
Political Science / World / Caribbean & Latin American
Social Science / Developing & Emerging Countries
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Сержіу БУАРКЕ ді ОЛАНДА [Sérgio Buarque de Holanda]
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