Conservation Laws in Variational Thermo-Hydrodynamics

Springer Science & Business Media
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This study is one of the first attempts to bridge the theoretical models of variational dynamics of perfect fluids and some practical approaches worked out in chemical and mechanical engineering in the field newly called thermo-hydrodynamics. In recent years, applied mathematicians and theoretical physicists have made significant progress in formulating analytical tools to describe fluid dynamics through variational methods. These tools are much loved by theoretists, and rightly so, because they are quite powerful and beautiful theoretical tools. Chemists, physicists and engineers, however, are limited in their ability to use these tools, because presently they are applicable only to "perfect fluids" (i. e. those fluids without viscosity, heat transfer, diffusion and chemical reactions). To be useful, a model must take into account important transport and rate phenomena, which are inherent to real fluid behavior and which cannot be ignored. This monograph serves to provide the beginnings of a means by which to extend the mathematical analyses to include the basic effects of thermo-hydrodynamics. In large part a research report, this study uses variational calculus as a basic theoretical tool, without undo compromise to the integrity of the mathematical analyses, while emphasizing the conservation laws of real fluids in the context of underlying thermodynamics --reversible or irreversible. The approach of this monograph is a new generalizing approach, based on Nother's theorem and variational calculus, which leads to the energy-momentum tensor and the related conservation or balance equations in fluids.
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Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
448
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ISBN
9789401110846
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Calculus
Mathematics / Functional Analysis
Mathematics / General
Science / Mechanics / Fluids
Science / Mechanics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Steve Awodey
Elias M. Stein
This first volume, a three-part introduction to the subject, is intended for students with a beginning knowledge of mathematical analysis who are motivated to discover the ideas that shape Fourier analysis. It begins with the simple conviction that Fourier arrived at in the early nineteenth century when studying problems in the physical sciences--that an arbitrary function can be written as an infinite sum of the most basic trigonometric functions.

The first part implements this idea in terms of notions of convergence and summability of Fourier series, while highlighting applications such as the isoperimetric inequality and equidistribution. The second part deals with the Fourier transform and its applications to classical partial differential equations and the Radon transform; a clear introduction to the subject serves to avoid technical difficulties. The book closes with Fourier theory for finite abelian groups, which is applied to prime numbers in arithmetic progression.

In organizing their exposition, the authors have carefully balanced an emphasis on key conceptual insights against the need to provide the technical underpinnings of rigorous analysis. Students of mathematics, physics, engineering and other sciences will find the theory and applications covered in this volume to be of real interest.

The Princeton Lectures in Analysis represents a sustained effort to introduce the core areas of mathematical analysis while also illustrating the organic unity between them. Numerous examples and applications throughout its four planned volumes, of which Fourier Analysis is the first, highlight the far-reaching consequences of certain ideas in analysis to other fields of mathematics and a variety of sciences. Stein and Shakarchi move from an introduction addressing Fourier series and integrals to in-depth considerations of complex analysis; measure and integration theory, and Hilbert spaces; and, finally, further topics such as functional analysis, distributions and elements of probability theory.

Francis J. Flanigan
A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: "A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation." Not so here — Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion of complex algebra is delayed for 100 pages, until harmonic functions have been analyzed from a real variable viewpoint. Students who have forgotten or never dealt with this material will find it useful for the subsequent functions. In addition, analytic functions are defined in a way which simplifies the subsequent theory. Contents include: Calculus in the Plane, Harmonic Functions in the Plane, Complex Numbers and Complex Functions, Integrals of Analytic Functions, Analytic Functions and Power Series, Singular Points and Laurent Series, The Residue Theorem and the Argument Principle, and Analytic Functions as Conformal Mappings.
Those familiar with mathematics texts will note the fine illustrations throughout and large number of problems offered at the chapter ends. An answer section is provided. Students weary of plodding mathematical prose will find Professor Flanigan's style as refreshing and stimulating as his approach.
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