2014 Global Hunger Index: The challenge of hidden hunger

 With one more year before the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, the 2014 Global Hunger Index report offers a multifaceted overview of global hunger that brings new insights to the global debate on where to focus efforts in the fight against hunger and malnutrition.

The state of hunger in developing countries as a group has improved since 1990, falling by 39 percent, according to the 2014 GHI. Despite progress made, the level of hunger in the world is still “serious,” with 805 million people continuing to go hungry, according to estimates by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

The global average obscures dramatic differences across regions and countries. Regionally, the highest GHI scores—and therefore the highest hunger levels—are in Africa south of the Sahara and South Asia, which have also experienced the greatest absolute improvements since 2005. South Asia saw the steepest absolute decline in GHI scores since 1990. Progress in addressing child underweight was the main factor behind the improved GHI score for the region since 1990.
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About the author

International Food Policy Research Institute: Klaus von Grebmer (Research Fellow Emeritus), Amy Saltzman (Senior Program Analyst), Ekin Birol (Head, Impact Research/Senior Research Fellow), Doris Wiesmann (Independent Consultant), Nilam Prasai (Data Curator), Sandra Yin (Editor), Yisehac Yohannes (Research Analyst), Purnima Menon (Senior Research Fellow)
Concern Worldwide: Jennifer Thompson (Advocacy Officer for Hunger)
Welthungerhilfe: Andrea Sonntag (Right to Food and Food Security Policy Officer)

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Additional Information

Publisher
Intl Food Policy Res Inst
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Published on
Oct 13, 2014
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Pages
56
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ISBN
9780896299580
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Agriculture & Food
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Eligible for Family Library

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von Grebmer, Klaus
The 2016 Global Hunger Index (GHI) presents a multidimensional measure of national, regional, and global hunger, focusing on how the world can get to Zero Hunger by 2030.

 

The developing world has made substantial progress in reducing hunger since 2000. The 2016 GHI shows that the level of hunger in developing countries as a group has fallen by 29 percent. Yet this progress has been uneven, and great disparities in hunger continue to exist at the regional, national, and subnational levels.

 

Levels of hunger are still serious or alarming in 50 countries. The highest hunger levels are still found in Africa south of the Sahara and South Asia. Although GHI scores for these two regions have declined over time, the current levels remain close to the alarming category. Africa south of the Sahara has achieved the largest absolute improvement since 2000 and South Asia has also seen a sizable reduction—but the decline in hunger must accelerate in these regions if the world is to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030.

 

The 2016 report, with an essay from United Nations Special Adviser David Nabarro, hails the new paradigm of international development proposed in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which envisages Zero Hunger by 2030, as one goal among 17, in a holistic, integrated, and transformative plan for the world. To get to Zero Hunger while leaving no one behind, the 2016 GHI highlights the importance of identifying the regions, countries, and populations that are most vulnerable to hunger and undernutrition so progress can be accelerated there.

von Grebmer, Klaus
The 2016 Global Hunger Index (GHI) presents a multidimensional measure of national, regional, and global hunger, focusing on how the world can get to Zero Hunger by 2030.

The developing world has made substantial progress in reducing hunger since 2000. The 2016 GHI shows that the level of hunger in developing countries as a group has fallen by 29 percent. Yet this progress has been uneven, and great disparities in hunger continue to exist at the regional, national, and subnational levels.

Levels of hunger are still serious or alarming in 50 countries. The highest hunger levels are still found in Africa south of the Sahara and South Asia. Although GHI scores for these two regions have declined over time, the current levels remain close to the alarming category. Africa south of the Sahara has achieved the largest absolute improvement since 2000 and South Asia has also seen a sizable reduction—but the decline in hunger must accelerate in these regions if the world is to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030.

The 2016 report, with an essay from United Nations Special Adviser David Nabarro, hails the new paradigm of international development proposed in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which envisages Zero Hunger by 2030, as one goal among 17, in a holistic, integrated, and transformative plan for the world. To get to Zero Hunger while leaving no one behind, the 2016 GHI highlights the importance of identifying the regions, countries, and populations that are most vulnerable to hunger and undernutrition so progress can be accelerated there.

von Grebmer, Klaus
The 2016 Global Hunger Index Africa Edition is produced by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Concern Worldwide, and Welthungerhilfe in conjunction with NEPAD. The GHI Africa Edition is based on data taken from the 2016 Global Hunger Index. IFPRI has calculated the Global Hunger Index, a multidimensional measure of global hunger, for the past eleven years. The series tracks the state of hunger across the globe and spotlights those regions and countries where action to address hunger is most urgently needed. The GHI Africa Edition shows that although progress between countries varies, the level of hunger in all countries across the continent of Africa, for which GHI scores could be calculated, has declined since 2000. Despite this progress, the level of hunger in many countries remains unacceptably high. Of the 42 countries in Africa for which GHI scores could be calculated in this report, only three countries have scores that fall into the “low” hunger category, while 28 fall into the “serious” category and five countries have 2016 scores in the “alarming” category. It is clear that governments must now follow through on their promises with political will and commitment to action that is both strong and sustained. The root causes of hunger are complex and require multi-sectoral and multilevel collaboration. The role of national governments in achieving these goals by significantly enhancing the quality of implementation is also clear. Yet Zero Hunger can only be achieved when governments measure progress and are accountable to citizens, which requires capacities to collect and analyze data, combined with open and comprehensive review and dialogue processes. The biennial review process established under Malabo and the support to inclusive Joint Sector Review (JSR) processes under CAADP are critical building blocks in this regard.
von Grebmer, Klaus
The developing world has made progress in reducing hunger since 2000. The 2015 Global Hunger Index (GHI) shows that the level of hunger in developing countries as a group has fallen by 27 percent. Yet the state of hunger in the world remains serious. This marks the tenth year that IFPRI has assessed global hunger using this multidimensional measure. This report’s GHI scores are based on a new, improved formula that replaces the child underweight indicator of previous years with child stunting and child wasting. This change reflects the latest thinking on the most suitable indicators for child undernutrition, one of three dimensions of hunger reflected in the GHI formula. Across regions and countries, GHI scores vary considerably. Regionally, the highest GHI scores, and therefore the highest hunger levels, are still found in Africa south of the Sahara and South Asia. Despite achieving the largest absolute improvements since 2000, these two regions still suffer from serious levels of hunger. Levels of hunger are alarming or serious in 52 countries. Most of the eight countries with alarming GHI scores are in Africa south of the Sahara. While no countries are classified in the extremely alarming category this year, this high level of hunger could still exist. Due to insufficient data, 2015 GHI scores could not be calculated for places that recently suffered from high levels of hunger, including Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Somalia, South Sudan, and Sudan.

2015 Global Hunger Index Interactive App: http://ghi.ifpri.org

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