Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America

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Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and Solidarity

When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump’s America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward.

Featuring essays by REBECCA SOLNIT on Trump and his “misogyny army,” CHERYL STRAYED on grappling with the aftermath of Hillary Clinton’s loss, SARAH HEPOLA on resisting the urge to drink after the election, NICOLE CHUNG on family and friends who support Trump, KATHA POLLITT on the state of reproductive rights and what we do next, JILL FILIPOVIC on Trump’s policies and the life of a young woman in West Africa, SAMANTHA IRBY on racism and living as a queer black woman in rural America, RANDA JARRAR on traveling across the country as a queer Muslim American, SARAH HOLLENBECK on Trump’s cruelty toward the disabled, MEREDITH TALUSAN on feminism and the transgender community, and SARAH JAFFE on the labor movement and active and effective resistance, among others.

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About the author

Samhita Mukhopadhyay is a writer, editor and speaker. She is the former Senior Editorial Director of Culture and Identities at Mic and former Executive Editor of Feministing.com. She is also the author of Outdated: Why Dating is Ruining Your Love Life. Her work has appeared in Al Jazeera, The Guardian, New York Magazine, Medium, Talking Points Memo and Jezebel.

Kate Harding is the author of Asking for It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture—and What We Can Do About It, which was chosen as a finalist for the Minnesota Book Award and as the freshman read for Tulane University’s class of 2020. She is also a co-author (with Anna Holmes and Amanda Hess) of The Book of Jezebel and, with Marianne Kirby, of Lessons from the Fat-o-Sphere. In 2007, she founded the popular body image and self-acceptance blog Shapely Prose, and her writing has appeared in The Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, U.S. News and World Report, Cosmopolitan, Salon, Jezebel, and Mic, among other publications. She is currently Assistant Director of the Women’s Resource Center at Cornell University and lives in Ithaca, NY.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Picador
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Published on
Oct 3, 2017
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781250155511
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Political Process / Political Advocacy
Social Science / Feminism & Feminist Theory
Social Science / LGBT Studies / General
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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