Postmodernism in a Global Perspective

SAGE Publications India
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During the past three decades, two terms, “postmodernism” and “globalization” have entered not only academic discourse, but everyday discussions outside the groves of academia. This book contains essays assembled with a conviction that both postmodernism and globalization have the potential to be valuable tools for social analysts, this despite the uncertainties and ambiguities that persist.

The editors and the contributors make no claim to have found a solution that would overcome the uncertainties and ambiguities. Rather, it is assumed that at some level both the concepts will remain contested. All the essays are expressions of efforts to employ one or both of the concepts in terms of empirically grounded topics. They also add further precision or clarity to the concepts themselves in order to enhance their utility in making sense of the dynamics of social change.
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About the author

Samir Dasgupta is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Kalyani, West Bengal, India. He is the Former Director of College Development Council, Kalyani University, Former Visiting Faculty, Department of Agriculture and Rural Development in West Bengal State University, and Advisory Committee Member of the Centre for the Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policy, University of Calcutta. His research interests lie on Applied Sociology, Development Studies and Sociology of Globalization, Urban Sociology, Economic Sociology, Environment Studies, and Peace Studies. He has received an award from the University of Kalyani for his contribution to the promotion of culture.

He is the author of more than fifty research papers and twenty two book chapters. His publications include: The Changing Face of Globalization (edited volume, 2004); Globalization and After (co-edited with Ray Kiely, 2006); Discourse on Applied Sociology: Theoretical Perspectives (co-edited with Robyn Driskell, 2007); Discourse on Applied Sociology: Practicing Perspectives (co-edited with Robyn Driskell, 2007); Politics of Globalization with Jan Nederveen Pieterse (2009); Understanding the Global Environment (2010); Arthanaitik Samajtatwa (2011); and Globalization and Humanity (Authored, 2011).

He serves as an editorial board member of the international journal Nature and Culture, U.S.A and Leipzeig, Germany, and International Journal of Business Ethics in Developing Economies.

Peter Kivisto is Richard A. Swanson Professor of Social Thought and Chair of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Welfare at Augustana College and Finland Distinguished Professor at the University of Turku. His current research involves a collaborative project on multiculturalism with colleagues in Finland. His interests include immigration, social integration, citizenship, and religion. Among his recent books are Key Ideas in Sociology (2011), Illuminating Social Life (2011); Beyond a Border: The Causes and Consequences of Contemporary Immigration (2010, with Thomas Faist); Citizenship: Discourse, Theory and Transnational Prospects (2007, with Thomas Faist); and Intersecting Inequalities (2007, with Elizabeth Hartung). He serves on the editorial boards of Contexts, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Intercultural Studies, and on the Publication Committee for Sociology of Religion.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications India
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Published on
Jun 10, 2014
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Pages
312
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ISBN
9789351500841
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction

When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merced, California, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover. Lia's parents, Foua and Nao Kao, were part of a large Hmong community in Merced, refugees from the CIA-run "Quiet War" in Laos. The Hmong, traditionally a close-knit and fiercely people, have been less amenable to assimilation than most immigrants, adhering steadfastly to the rituals and beliefs of their ancestors. Lia's pediatricians, Neil Ernst and his wife, Peggy Philip, cleaved just as strongly to another tradition: that of Western medicine. When Lia Lee Entered the American medical system, diagnosed as an epileptic, her story became a tragic case history of cultural miscommunication.

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