Hawaiian Grammar

University of Hawaii Press
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Without question, this is the definitive grammar of the Hawaiian language. Indeed it is the first attempt at a comprehensive treatment of the subject since W.D. Alexander published his concise Short Synopsis of the Most Essential Points in Hawaiian Grammar in 1864. This grammar is intended as a companion to the Hawaiian Dictionary, by the same authors.

The grammar was written with every student of the Hawaiian language in mind - from the casual interested layperson to the professional linguist and grammarian. Although it was obviously impossible to avoid technical terms, their use was kept to a minimum, and a glossary is included for those who need its help. Each point of grammar is illustrated with examples, many from Hawaiian-language literature.

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About the author

Samuel H. Elbert, professor emeritus of Pacific languages and linguistics at the University of Hawaii, taught the Hawaiian language for many years and is considered one of the foremost authorities on the language today. He is author of the textbook Spoken Hawaiian and is co-author with Mary Pukui of Hawaiian Dictionary, and with Mary Pukui and Esther Mookini of Place Names of Hawaii.

Mary Kawena Pukui was a noted authority on the Hawaiian language. She had a long professional association with the Bernice P. Bishop Museum and translated many Hawaiian historical documents. She coauthored, with Samuel H. Elbert, the Hawaiian Dictionary and Place Names of Hawaii.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Hawaii Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2001
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Pages
193
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ISBN
9780824824891
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Foreign Language Study / Miscellaneous
Language Arts & Disciplines / General
Literary Collections / Australian & Oceanian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Haina ia mai ana ka puana. This familiar refrain, sometimes translated Let the echo of our song be heard, appears among the closing lines in many nineteenth-century chants and poems. From earliest times, the chanting of poetry served the Hawaiians as a form of ritual celebration of the things they cherished--the beauty of their islands, the abundance of wild creatures that inhabited their sea and air, the majesty of their rulers, and the prowess of their gods. Commoners as well as highborn chiefs and poet-priests shared in the creation of the chants. These haku mele, or composers, the commoners especially, wove living threads from their own histoic circumstances and everyday experiences into the ongoing oral tradition, as handed down from expert to pupil, or from elder to descendant, generation after generation.

This anthology embraces a wide variety of compositions: it ranges from song-poems of the Pele and Hiiaka cycle and the pre-Christian Shark Hula for Ka-lani-opuu to postmissionary chants and gospel hymns. These later selections date from the reign of Ka-mehameha III (1825-1854) to that of Queen Liliu-o-ka-lani (1891-1893) and comprise the major portion of the book. They include, along with heroic chants celebrating nineteenth-century Hawaiian monarchs, a number of works composed by commoners for commoners, such as Bill the Ice Skater, Mr. Thurston's Water-Drinking Brigade, and The Song of the Chanter Kaehu. Kaehu was a distinguished leper-poet who ended his days at the settlement-hospital on Molokai.

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