Metaphysics and the Good: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams

OUP Oxford
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Throughout his philosophical career at Michigan, UCLA, Yale, and Oxford, Robert Merrihew Adams's wide-ranging contributions have deeply shaped the structure of debates in metaphysics, philosophy of religion, history of philosophy, and ethics. Metaphysics and the Good: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams provides, for the first time, a collection of original essays by leading philosophers dedicated to exploring many of the facets of Adams's thought, a philosophical outlook that combines Christian theism, neo-Platonism, moral realism, metaphysical idealism, and a commitment to both historical sensitivity and rigorous analytic engagement. Tied together by their aim of exploring, expanding, and experimenting with Adams's views, these eleven essays are coupled with an intellectual autobiography by Adams himself that was commissioned especially for this volume. As the introduction to the volume explains, the purpose of Metaphysics and the Good is to explore Adams's work in the very manner that he prescribes for understanding the ideas of others. By experimenting with Adams's conclusions, "pulling a string here to see what moves over there, so to speak", as Adams puts it, our authors throw into greater relief what makes Adams such an original and stimulating philosopher. In doing so, these essays contribute not only to the exploration of Adams's continuing interests, but they also advance original and important philosophical insights of their own.
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About the author

Samuel Newlands is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. Larry M. Jorgensen is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Valparaiso University.
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Additional Information

Publisher
OUP Oxford
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Published on
Jan 8, 2009
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Pages
432
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ISBN
9780191562228
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Philosophy / History & Surveys / General
Philosophy / Metaphysics
Philosophy / Mind & Body
Religion / Philosophy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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